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Ecology, Justice, and the Sacred (Eaton)

Course Title

Ecology, Justice, and the Sacred
THO 2147

   
Instructor(s)

Heather Eaton
St. Paul University
University of Ottawa

   
Discipline

Religion

   
Subject(s)

Feminist Theology; Theology; Ecotheology; Globalization

   
Pedagogical Level

Undergraduate

   
Date

Summer 1998

   
Presentation

St. Paul University

   
Overview

Course Description
An investigation into the immense ecological challenge of our era. Examination of religious responses to the ecological crisis. Study of contemporary theological/religious themes (liberation, feminist, and eco-theology; multifaith collaboration; global ethics, postmodern approaches to natural theology) in relation to the development of ecological theology, ethics, and spirituality.

Course Objectives
To heighten awareness of the magnitude of the social and ecological crises, and the necessity of religious responses. To examine the relationship between elements of the Christian tradition(s) and the development of the ecological crisis, critical of the limitations and cognizant of the contributions. To join efforts with those expanding the horizon of religious concerns and sensibilities to encompass the earth. To reinterpret aspects of the Christian tradition in view of the challenges of this era and the complexities of our world. To accept the interreligious reality of our world, and the need to cooperate and learn from each tradition. To develop an adequate ethical framework and a responsive spirituality to enable those with religious orientations to join with those attempting to heal the world/earth.

   
Format

Teaching Method
An aim of this course is to provide the essential background to becoming literate about the ecological challenge to religion and theology. Together we will engage in an indepth analyses of the questions, problems, and responses, in a learning environment that promotes critical thinking, reflection, discussion, evaluation and debate. The student is expected to take charge of her/his own learning process, to become engaged in the issues and topics, to contribute and benefit from a strong level of well prepared discussion in a community of learning adults. Students are required to do the readings before class as the discussions and lectures will depend on prior reading. Throughout the course we will engage in different kinds of learning styles and discussion groups (panels, small groups, debates, videos).

This course is divided into four parts:

Part 1: Theology and the Ecological Crisis
This course begins with an overview of the contemporary ecological crisis and the various theological responses to that crisis.

Part 2: Theological and Religious Response
Given the magnitude of the crises (both physical and ideological), how do you evaluate these three responses to the ecological challenge to the theology/religion? With what tools, critiques, analyses? (Due: July 20)

Part 3: Globalization, Economics, and Justice
How does or how should the concerns of the perspectives in these readings influence or impact on religious and theological awareness? (Due: July 24)

Part 4: New Religious/Ecological Sensibilities
Where do you see the most potential for adequate religious responses to the ecological crisis? Where do you see the least? (Due: July 31)

   
Prerequisites

None listed

   
Requirements

Requirements

Course Workload

Two Brief Papers or In-Class Discussion
35%
Take-Home Exam or Project
50%
Class Participation: Readings, Discussions
15%
  1. Two Brief Papers or In-Class Discussion
    Over the four weeks each student is required to submit two (2) one-page papers on two different segments of the course. These will be indepth responses to topics covered in the course material. A question will be given at the beginning of each segment which will orient the papers. Papers should be exactly one-page (double-spaced) in length. Each paper begins with a thesis statement of no more than 20 words, and the paper develops the thesis statement. (Each paper is due at the end of that segment, and both are due by July 29).
    or

    One 15 minute in-class presentation on a particular topic to be discussed with the professor. Several students (maximum four) may join together for a 30–minute presentation. Each student will bring a one-page, double-spaced typed paper outlining the thesis or main point of the presentation, brief summary of the argument, and two critical questions for class discussion.


  2. Take-Home Exam or Project
    Take Home Exam
    Covering critical reflection on and synthesis of the general material of the course. Students will receive the exam on July 29 and it must be returned by August 3.
    or

    Project
    This option is open to creative consideration given the interests, talents, and strengths of each student. It could be a research or reflection paper (8–10 pages), a 30–minute presentation, outing, liturgy, etc. It could relate directly to the area of work of the student (teaching, parish, farming, the arts, poetry, etc.). Please consider this an option as it usually is most fulfilling, creative, and relevant if the project is something you really want to do. The best work is done when you follow your interests and passions. Paper submissions are due on August 3. Class projects need to be scheduled with the professor.

    You must choose one of the options and notify the professor of your choice by July 13.


  3. Participation
    Student input is requested in this course.


General Criteria of Evaluation

Written Material
Students are required to utilize a clear writing style and correct grammar and produce well-organized papers. For research papers, the correct bibliographic and foot/end note format is required. Do not reiterate reading material; I am interested in what you think after reading and reflecting on the subject.

Presentations
Presentations should be clear, show the student’s competency of the materials, provide points of engagement for the class discussions, and allow for the emergence of critical questioning of the material.

Participation
Students are required to read the articles and come to class prepared to participate in the discussions. They are also required to be respectful of other people’s opinions and positions and to listen carefully to discussions in order to foster critical thought among various participants of the community.

Readings
The course readings are comprised of a collection of articles which indicate the broad scope of the alliance of religion and ecology, as well as of specific approaches to particular questions. There is no book that could provide both a comprehensive and multi-faceted approach. The readings are compulsory for the course.

The readings will be available on reserve in the library. (Note that the photocopy costs to duplicate the readings from the library copies will be more than at the printing office).
   
Evaluation

Grades

Papers
35%
Participation
15%
Final Project
50%
   
Texts

Required Texts
Anthology of readings provided by professor (available for purchase or on reserve in library). See “Bibliography” and “Books on Reserve” (listed below) for more information.

 
Schedule
July 3

Introduction of Course Outline, Method, and Participants
Video: Our Common Future

 

Part 1: Theology and the Ecological Crisis

July 6

The Ecological Crisis: The Natural World and Human Ideology
Assigned Reading

  • Brown, Lester. “The Future of Growth,” in State of the World, 1998. WorldWatch Institute (New York: W.W. Norton & Co, 1998) 3–20.
  • White, Lynn. “The Historical Roots of The Ecologic Crisis,” Science 15 (10 March 1967) 1203–1207.
  • Boff, Leonardo. “The Ecological Crisis,” in Cry of the Earth, Cry of the Poor (Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1997) 63–85.
July 8

Roots of the Crisis
Assigned Reading

  • Northcott, Michael. “The Origins of the Environmental Crisis,” in The Environment and Christian Ethics (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996) 40–85.
  • Santmire, Paul. The Travail of Nature: The Ambiguous Ecological Promise of Christian Theology (Minneapolis, Minn.: Fortress Press, 1985) 1–12, 175–83.
Video: Thomas Berry
July 10

Challenge to and Context of Contemporary Theologies
Assigned Reading

  • McFague, Sally. “An Earthly Theological Agenda,” in Ecofeminism and the Sacred, ed. Carol Adams (New York: Continuum, 1993) 84–98.
  • Schreiter, Robert. “Globalization and the Contexts of Theology,” in The New Catholicity: Theology Between the Global and the Local (Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1997) 1–27.
Video: Renew the Whole Creation!
Chung Hyun Kyung World Council of
Churches, 1991
 

Part 2: Theological and Religious Response

July 13

Biblical Inquiry
Assigned Reading

  • Ruether, Rosemary Radford. “Three Classical Creation Stories,” Gaia and God (San Francisco, Calif.: Harper, 1993) 15–31.
  • McAfee, Gene. “Ecology and Biblical Studies,” in Theology for Earth Community, ed. Dieter Hessel (Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1996) 31–44.
You must decide by today if you are doing a project or a take-home exam.
July 15

Liberation Theologies
Assigned Reading

  • Ackermann, Denise, and Tahira Joyner. “Earth Healing in South Africa: Challenges to Church and Mosque,” in Women Healing Earth: Third World Women in Ecology, Feminism, and Religion, ed. Rosemary Radford Ruether (Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1996) 121–34.
  • Boff, Leonardo. “Liberation Theology and Ecology: Rivals or Partners?” in Cry of the Earth, Cry of the Poor (Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1997) 104–14.
  • Mendieta, Eduardo. “From Christendom to Polycentric Oikonumé: Modernity, Postmodernity, and Liberation Theology,” in Liberation Theologies, Postmodernity, and the Americas, ed. David Batstone et al. (New York: Routledge, 1997) 253–72.
July 17

Ecofeminism
Assigned Reading

  • Clifford, Anne. “When Being Human Becomes Truly Earthly: An Ecofeminist Proposal for Solidarity,” in The Embrace of God: Feminist Approaches to Theological Anthropology (Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1997) 173–89.
  • Ruether, Rosemary Radford. “Ecofeminism: Symbolic and Social Connections of the Oppression of Women and the Domination of Nature,” Public Lecture, 1993.
Video: Ecofeminism Now!
 

Part 3: Globalization, Economics, and Justice

July 20 Ecological Issues, Justice, and Global Ecosystems
Assigned Reading
  • Bullard, Robert. “Environmental Racism and the Environmental Justice Movement,” in Ecology: Key Concepts in Critical Theory: Ecology, ed. Carolyn Merchant (Atlantic Highlands, N.J.: Humanities Press, 1994) 254–65.
  • Guha, Ramachandra. “Radical Environmentalism: A Third World Critique,” in Ecology, ed. Carolyn Merchant (New Jersey: Humanities Press, 1994) 281–90.
  • Colborn, Theo, et al. “To The Ends of the Earth,” in Our Stolen Future (New York: Plume, 1997) 87–109.

Video: Exposure: Environmental Links to Breast Cancer

July 22

Globalization
Assigned Reading

  • Kung, Hans. “Questions About Globalization,” in A Global Ethic for Global Politics and Economics (London: SCM Press, 1997) 160–83.
Video: The Damned: David Suzuki Whose Counting? Marilyn Waring
 

Part 4: New Religious/Ecological Sensibilities

July 24

Worldview and Paradigm Shifts
Assigned Reading

  • Dunn, Stephen, and Anne Lonergan, eds. Befriending the Earth: A Theology of Reconciliation Between Humans and the Earth: Thomas Berry and Thomas Clarke (Mystic, Conn.: Twenty-Third Publications, 1991) 94–118.
  • Wei-Ming, Tu. “Beyond the Enlightenment Mentality,” Worldviews and Ecology. eds. Mary Evelyn Tucker and John Grim (Lewisburg, Pa.: Bucknell University Press, 1993) 19–29.
July 27

One Earth: Many Religions
Assigned Reading

  • Knitter, Paul. “The One Earth and Our Many Stories,” in One Earth: Many Religions: Multifaith Dialogue and Global Responsibility (Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1995) 118–35.
  • Tucker, Mary Evelyn. “The Emerging Alliance of Religion and Ecology,” Worldviews: Environment, Culture, Religion 1, no. 1 (Fall 1997) 3–24.
  • Rockefeller, Steven. “The Wisdom of Reverence for Life,” in The Greening of Faith: God, The Environment and the Good Life, eds., John Carroll et. al. (Hanover, N.H.: University Press of New England, 1997) 44–61.
Video: David Abram
Video: Sulphur Passage
July 29

Awakening New Religious Sensitivities
Assigned Reading

  • Berry, Thomas. “An Ecologically Sensitive Spirituality,” Christian Spirituality Bulletin 5, no. 2 (1997): 1–6.
  • Orr, David. “What is Education For?” Earth Ethics 3, no. 3 (1992): 1–5.
  • Earth Charter
Video: Where We Go From Here, Thomas Berry

Assignments Due
  • All projects and papers must be in by today.
July 31

Future Directions
Assigned Reading

For this class each person will write a one page paper on her/his thoughts on the future for religion/theology given the ecological crisis and the challenge to the world’s religions and those with religious sensitivities. You may want to find an article which suggests, debates, or disputes your viewpoint.

   
Additional Materials

Bibliography

Adams, Carol, ed. Ecofeminism and the Sacred. New York: Continuum, 1993.

Anderson, E. N. Ecologies of the Heart: Emotion, Belief and the Environment. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996.

Batstone, David, et. al. Liberation Theologies, Postmodernity, and the Americas. New York: Routledge, 1997.

Berry, Thomas. The Dream of the Earth. San Francisco: Sierra Club Books, 1988.

Birch, Charles, William Eakin, and Jay McDaniel, eds., Liberating Life: Contemporary Approaches to Ecological Theology. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1990.

Boff, Leonardo. Cry of the Earth, Cry of the Poor. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1997.
_______. Ecology and Liberation. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1995.

Brown, Lester. State of the World, 1988. (WorldWatch Institute) New York: W. W. Norton and Company, 1998.

Carroll, John, et al. The Greening of Faith: God, The Environment and the Good Life. Hanover, N.H.: University of New Hampshire, 1997.

Chapple, Christopher, ed. Ecological Prospects: Scientific, Religious and Aesthetic Perspectives. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1994.

Christiansen, Drew, and Walter Grazer, eds. And God Saw that it was Good: Catholic Theology and the Environment. Washington: U.S. Catholic Conference, 1996.

Clifford, Anne. “When Being Human Becomes Truly Earthly: An Ecofeminist Proposal for Solidarity,” in The Embrace of God: Feminist Approaches to Theological Anthropology, 173–89. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1997.
_______. “Postmodern Scientific Cosmology and the Christian God of Creation,” Horizons 21, no. 1 (1994) 62–84.

Colborn, Theo, et al. Our Stolen Future. New York: Plume, 1997.

Cooper, David, and Joy Palmer, eds. Spirit of the Environment: Religion, Value, and Environmental Concern. New York: Routledge, 1998.

D’Arcy May, John. “Rights of the Earth and Care for the Earth: Two Paradigms for a Buddhist-Christian Ecological Ethics,” Horizons 21, no. 1 (1994): 48–61.

Dunn, Stephen, and Anne Lonergan, eds. Befriending the Earth: A Theology of Reconciliation Between Humans and the Earth: Thomas Berry and Thomas Clarke. Mystic, Conn.: Twenty-Third Publications, 1991.

Eaton, Heather. “Ecofeminism, Cosmology, and Spiritual Renewal,” Eglise et Théologie 29 (1998): 115–28.
_______. “Liaison or Liability: Weaving Spirituality into Ecofeminist Politics,” Atlantis 21, no. 1 (1997): 109–22.
_______. “Earth Patterns: Feminism, Ecology, Religion,” Vox Feminarum: The Canadian Journal of Feminist Spirituality 1, no. 2 (1996): 7–18.
_______. “Ecofeminist Theology,” Theology for Earth Community. ed. Deiter Hessel. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1995.

Franklin, Ursula. The Real World of Technology. Concord, Ontario: House of Anansi Press, 1990.

Gilkey, Langdon. Nature, Reality and the Sacred: The Nexus of Science and Religion. Minneapolis, Minn.: Fortress Press, 1993.

Gottlieb, Roger, ed. This Sacred Earth: Religion, Nature, Environment. New York: Routledge, 1996.

Griffin, David Ray, and Richard Falk, eds. Postmodern Politics for a Planet in Crisis. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1993.
_______., and Houston Smith. Primordial Truth and Postmodern Theology. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1989.

Griffin, David Ray. God and Religion in the Postmodern World. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1989.
________. Spirituality and Society. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1988.
________. The Reenchantment of Science: Postmodern Proposals. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1988.

Griffin, Susan. “Split Culture,” ReVision 9, no. 2 (Winter/Spring 1987): 17–23.

Hallman, David. A Place in Creation: Ecological Visions in Science, Religion, and Economics. Toronto: United Church Publishing House, 1992.

Haught, John. The Promise of Nature: Ecology and Cosmic Purpose. New York: Paulist, 1993.

Hessel, Dieter, ed. Theology for Earth Community. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1996.

Hewitt, Marsha. Critical Theory of Religion: A Feminist Appraisal. Minneapolis, Minn.: Fortress Press, 1995.

Homer-Dixon, Thomas, et al. “Environmental Change and Violent Conflict,” Scientific America (February 1993): 38–45.

Hull, Fritz, ed. Earth and Spirit: The Spiritual Dimensions of the Environmental Crisis. New York: Continuum, 1993.

Johnson, Elizabeth. Women, Earth, and Creator Spirit. Madeleva Lecture in Spirituality: St. Mary’s College, Notre Dame, 1993.

Kaplan, Robert. “The Coming Anarchy,” The Atlantic Monthly (February 1994) 44–76.

Kinsley, David. Ecology and Religion: Ecological Spirituality in Cross-Cultural Perspectives. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 1995.

Knitter, Paul. One Earth, Many Religions: Multifaith Dialogue and Global Responsibility. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1995.

Kung, Hans. A Global Ethics for Global Politics and Economics. London: SCM, 1997.

LaChance, Albert, and John Carroll, eds. Embracing Earth: Catholic Approaches to Ecology. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1994.

Macy, Joanna. World as Lover, World as Self. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1991.

Maguire, Daniel, and Larry Rasmussen. Ethics for a Small Planet: New Horizons on Population, Consumption, and Ecology. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1998.

Martin, Daniel, “The Voices of the Earth,” in The Spirit of the Earth Newsletter of the International Coordinating Committee on Religion and the Earth, 2 (Summer 1994): 1–3.

McDonagh, Sean. Passion for the Earth: The Christian Vocation to Promote Justice, Peace, and Integrity of Creation. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1994.
_______. The Greening of the Church. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis Books, 1990.
_______. To Care for the Earth. London: G. Chapman, 1986.

McFague, Sally. Super, Natural Christian: How We Should Love Nature. Minneapolis, Minn.: Fortress, 1997.
________. The Body of God: An Ecological Theology. Minneapolis, Minn.: Fortress Press, 1993.
_______. Models of God: Theology for an Ecological, Nuclear Age. London: SCM Press, 1987.

McKibben, Bill. The End of Nature. New York: Random House, 1989.

Merchant, Carolyn, ed. Ecology: Key Concepts in Critical Theory. Atlantic Highlands, N.J.: Humanities Press, 1994.
_______. Radical Ecology: The Search for a Livable World. New York: Routledge, 1992.
_______. The Death of Nature: Women Ecology and the Scientific Revolution. New York: Harper & Row, 1982.

Mies, Maria. Patriarchy and the Accumulation of Capital on a World Scale: Women in the International Division of Labour. London: Zed Books, 1986.

Moltmann, Jurgen. “Reconciliation with Nature,” Word and World 2, no. 2 (Spring 1991): 117–24.
_______. God in Creation: A New Theology of Creation and the Spirit of God. San Francisco, Calif.: Harper & Row, 1985.

Nash, James. Loving Nature: Ecological Integrity and Christian Responsibility. Nashville, Tenn.: Abingdon Press, 1991.

Nasr, Seyyed Hossein. Religion and the Order of Nature. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996.

Northcott, Michael. The Environment and Christian Ethics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996.

Oelschlaeger, Max, ed. Postmodern Environmental Ethics. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1995.
_______. Caring for Creation: An Ecumenical Approach to the Environmental Crisis. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1994.

O’Hara Graff, Ann, ed. In The Embrace of God: Feminist Aproaches to Theological Anthropology. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1995.

Orr, David. Ecological Literacy: Education and the Transition to a Postmodern World. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1992.

Primavesi, Anne. From Apocalypse to Genesis. Minneapolis, Minn.: Fortress Press, 1991.

Rae, Eleanor. Women, the Earth, the Divine. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1994.

Rasmussen, Larry. Earth Community, Earth Ethics. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1996.
_______. “Honoring Creation’s Integrity,” Christianity and Crisis 51 (18 November 1991): 354–58.
_______. “Ecocrisis and Theology,” Christianity and Crisis 52 (16 March 1992): 83–87.

Robb, Carol, and Carl Casebolt. Covenant for a New Creation. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1991.

Rockefeller, Stephen. “Democratic Foundations for a World Ethics of Living Sustainably,” Earth Ethics 5, no. 1 (Fall 1993).
_______., and John Elder, eds. Spirit and Nature: Why the Environment is a Religious Issue. Boston: Beacon, 1992.

Roszak, Theodore. “Eco-Psychology,” Earth Ethics 5, no. 2 (Winter 1994): 1, 3–5.

Rowell, Andrew. Green Backlash: Global Subversion of the Environmental Movement. New York: Routledge, 1996.

Ruether, Rosemary Radford. Women Healing Earth: Third World Women on Ecology, Feminism, and Religion. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1996.
_______. Gaia and God. San Francisco, Calif.: Harper, 1992.
_______. “Ecofeminism: Symbolic Connections Between the Oppression of Women and the Domination of Nature.” Loy H. Witherspoon Lecture in Religious Studies. University of North Carolina (31 October 1991): 1–17.
_______. New Woman/New Earth: Sexist Ideologies and Human Liberation. New York: Seabury Press, 1973.

Sachs, Wolfgang, ed. Global Ecology: A New Arena of Political Conflict. London: Zed Books, 1993.

Sahtouris, Elisabet. Gaia: The Human Journey from Chaos to Cosmos. New York: Pocket Books, 1989.

Santmire, Paul. The Travail of Nature: The Ambiguous Ecological Promise of Christian Theology. Minneapolis, Minn.: Fortress Press, 1985.

Schreiter, Robert. The New Catholicity: Theology Between the Global and the Local. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1997.

Shiva, Vandana. Biopiracy: The Plunder of Nature and Knowledge. Toronto: Between the Lines, 1997.
_______., and Marie Mies. Ecofeminism. London: Zed Books, 1993.
_______. Staying Alive: Women Ecology and Development. London: Zed Books, 1988.

Soelle, Dorothy. Window of Vulnerability: A Political Spirituality. Minneapolis, Minn.: Fortress Press, 1991.
_______. To Work and To Love: A Theology of Creation. Philadelphia, Pa.: Fortress Press, 1984.

Spretnak, Charlene. States of Grace. San Francisco, Calif.: Harper, 1991.

Taylor, Duncan. Off Course. Ottawa: International Development Research Centre, 1994.

Thomas, Lewis. The Fragile Species. New York: MacMillan Publishers, 1992.

Toulmin, Stephen. Cosmopolis: The Hidden Agenda of Modernity. New York: Free Press, 1990.
_______. The Return to Cosmology: Post Modern Science and the Theology of Nature. Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 1985.

Tracy, David, and Nicholas Lash, ed. Cosmology and Theology. Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark; New York: Seabury Press, 1983.

Tucker, Mary Evelyn, and Duncan Ryuken Williams, eds. Buddhism and Ecology: The Interconnection of Dharma and Deeds. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1997.
_______., and John Grim, eds. Worldviews and Ecology. Lewisburg, Pa.: Bucknell University Press, 1993

Waring, Marilyn. If Women Counted: A New Feminist Economics. San Francisco, Calif.: Harper Collins, 1988.

Warren, Karen, ed. Ecological-Feminism. New York: Routledge, 1994. White, Lynn. “The Historical Roots of The Ecologic Crisis,” Science 15 (10 March 1967): 1203–1207.

Winter, Gibson. Liberating Creation: Foundations of Social Ethics. New York: Crossroads, 1981.

Women and Environments: Charting a New Environment Course 13, no. 2 (Winter/Spring 1991).

World Commission on Environment and Development. Our Common Future. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1987.

Books on Reserve

Berry, Thomas. The Dream of the Earth. San Francisco: Sierra Club Books, 1988.

Birch, Charles, William Eakin, and Jay McDaniel, eds. Liberating Life: Contemporary Approaches to Ecological Theology. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1990.

Boff, Leonardo. Ecology and Liberation. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1995.

Conlon, James. Earth Story, Sacred Story. Mystic, Conn.: Twenty-Third Publications, 1994.

Dunn, Stephen, and Anne Lonergan, eds. Befriending the Earth: A Theology of Reconciliation Between Humans and the Earth: Thomas Berry and Thomas Clarke. Mystic, Conn.: Twenty-Third Publications, 1991.

Haught, John. The Promise of Nature: Ecology and Cosmic Purpose. New York: Paulist, 1993.

Hessel, Dieter, ed. Theology for Earth Community. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1996.

LaChance, Albert, and John Carroll, eds. Embracing Earth: Catholic Approaches to Ecology. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1994.

McDaniel, Jay. With Roots and Wings: Christianity in an Age of Ecology and Dialogue. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1995.

McFague, Sally. Super, Natural Christian: How We Should Love Nature. Minneapolis, Minn.: Fortress, 1997.

Nasr, Seyyed Hossein. Religion and the Order of Nature. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996.

Northcott, Michael. The Environment and Christian Ethics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996.

O’Hara Graff, Ann, ed. In The Embrace of God: Feminist Aproaches to Theological Anthropology. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1995.

Rasmussen, Larry. Earth Community, Earth Ethics. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1996.

Rockefeller, Steven, and John Elder, eds. Spirit and Nature: Why the Environment is a Religious Issue. Boston: Beacon, 1992.

Ruether, Rosemary Radford. Women Healing Earth: Third World Women on Ecology, Feminism, and Religion. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1996.

Santmire, Paul. The Travail of Nature: The Ambiguous Ecological Promise of Christian Theology. Minneapolis, Minn.: Fortress Press, 1985.

Schreiter, Robert. The New Catholicity: Theology Between the Global and the Local. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1997.

Tucker, Mary Evelyn, and John Grim, eds. Worldviews and Ecology. Lewisburg, Pa.: Bucknell University Press, 1993

 

Copyright © 1998 Heather Eaton.
Reprinted with permission.
The author retains all copyrights for all syllabi materials.
Please contact each author individually for reprint rights.

Liberation Theologies, Postmodernity, and the Americas