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Hinduism Introduction - Part 2



Endnotes

1 N. Patrick Peritore, “Environmental Attitudes of Indian Elites: Challenging Western Postmodernist Models,” Asian Survey 33 (1993): 807.
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2 Ramachandra Guha, “Radical American Environmentalism: A Third World Critique,” in Ethical Perspectives on Environmental Issues in India, ed. George A. James (New Delhi: A.P.H. Publishing Corporation, 1999) 115–30. First published in Environmental Ethics 11, no.1 (1989): 71–83.
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3 Madhav Gadgil and Ramachandra Guha, Ecology and Equity: The Use and Abuse of Nature in Contemporary India (New Delhi: Penguin, 1995) 3–5.
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4 Ibid., 180.
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5 Ibid., 182.
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6 Vikram K. Akula, “Grassroots Environmental Resistance in India,” in Ecological Resistance Movements: The Global Emergence of Radical and Popular Environmentalism, ed. Bron Raymond Taylor (Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1995) 127.
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7 Peritore, “Environmental Attitudes of Indian Elites,” 804.
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8 Ibid., 817.
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9 Ibid., 818.
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10 Payal Sampat, “What Does India Want?” World Watch 11, no. 4 (1998): 31.
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11Gerald James Larson, India’s Agony over Religion (Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1995) 199.
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12 O. P. Dwivedi, India’s Environmental Policies, Programmes, and Stewardship (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1997) 22–23.
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13 India Today, 16 December 1996, 39.
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14 Anil Agarwal, electronic communication from Center for Science and Environment, 22 April 1999.
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15 India Today, 15 January 1997, 121–23.
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16 Dwivedi, India’s Environmental Policies, Programmes and Stewardship, 11.
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17 Anil Agarwal, electronic communication, 3 February 1999.
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18 Lynn White, Jr., “The Historical Roots of Our Ecologic Crisis,” Science 155 (1967): 1203–1207.
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19 Purifying the Earthly Body of God: Religion and Ecology in Hindu India, ed. Lance Nelson (Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1998) 61–81.
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20 Thomas Berry, The Dream of the Earth (San Francisco, Calif.: Sierra Club Books, 1988).
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21 Larson, India’s Agony over Religion, 20–21.
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22 Christopher Key Chapple, Nonviolence to Animals, Earth, and Self in Asian Traditions (Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1993).
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23 Christopher Key Chapple, “Toward an Indigenous Indian Environmentalism,” Purifying the Earthly Body of God, ed. Nelson.
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24 Vasudha Narayanan, “‘One Tree Is Equal to Ten Sons’: Hindu Responses to the Problems of Ecology, Population, and Consumption,” Journal of the American Academy of Religion 65, no. 2 (1991): 321.
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25 Ibid., 311.
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26 Swami Agnivesh, personal conversation, 11 January 1999.
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27 Thomas Blom Hansen, The Saffron Wave: Democracy and Hindu Nationalism in Modern India (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1999) 233.
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28 Anil Agarwal, “My Story Today, Your Story Tomorrow: An Environmentalist Searches for the Genesis of His Own Cancer,” Down To Earth 5, no. 13 (30 November 1996): 30–37.
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    Copyright © 2000 Center for the Study of World Religions, Harvard Divinity School.
Reprinted with permission.