Home » Publications » Books » Religions of the World and Ecology Book Series » The Challenge of the Environmental Crisis » Here

The Challenge of the Environmental Crisis - Part 2


Endnotes

1 He goes on to say, “And that is qualitatively and epochally true. If religion does not speak to [this], it is an obsolete distraction.” Daniel Maguire, The Moral Core of Judaism and Christianity: Reclaiming the Revolution (Philadelphia: Fortress, 1993) 13.
Return to text

2 Gerald Barney, Global 2000 Report to the President of the United States (Washington, D.C.: Supt. of Docs. U.S. Government Printing Office, 1980–1981) 40.
Return to text

3 Lynn White, Jr., “The Historical Roots of Our Ecologic Crisis,” Science 155 (March 1967): 1204.
Return to text

4 Thomas Berry, The Dream of the Earth (San Francisco: Sierra Club Books, 1988).
Return to text

5 Brian Swimme and Thomas Berry, The Universe Story (San Francisco: HarperSanFrancisco, 1992).
Return to text

6 At the same time we recognize the limits to such a project, especially because ideas and action, theory and practice, do not always occur in conjunction.
Return to text

7 E. N. Anderson, Ecologies of the Heart: Emotion, Belief, and the Environment (New York: Oxford University Press, 1996) 166. He qualifies this statement by saying, “The key point is not religion per se, but the use of emotionally powerful symbols to sell particular moral codes and management systems” (p. 166). He notes, however, in various case studies, how ecological wisdom is embedded in myths, symbols, and cosmologies of traditional societies.
Return to text

8 Is It Too Late? is also the title of a book by John Cobb, first published in 1972 by Bruce and reissued in 1995 by Environmental Ethics Books.
Return to text

9 Because we cannot identify here all of the methodological issues that need to be addressed, we invite further discussion by other engaged scholars.
Return to text

10 See J. Baird Callicott, Earth’s Insights: A Survey of Ecological Ethics from the Mediterranean Basin to the Australian Outback (Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 1994).
Return to text

11 See Martha C. Nussbaum and Amartya Sen, eds., The Quality of Life, WIDER Studies in Development Economics (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993).
Return to text

12 White, “The Historical Roots of Our Ecologic Crisis,” 1203–1207.
Return to text

13 Process theology, creation-centered spirituality, and ecotheology have done much to promote these kinds of holistic perspectives within Christianity.
Return to text

14 These are resources already being explored by theologians and biblical scholars.
Return to text

15 While this is true theoretically, it should be noted that, like all ideologies, these traditions have at times been used for purposes of political power and social control. Moreover, they have not been able to prevent certain kinds of environmental destruction, such as deforestation in China.
Return to text

16 The term “anthropocosmic” has been used by Tu Weiming in Centrality and Commonality (Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1989).
Return to text

17 Thomas Berry, “Religious Studies and the Global Human Community,” unpublished manuscript.
Return to text

18 Tu Weiming, “Beyond the Enlightenment Mentality,” in Worldviews and Ecology, eds. Mary Evelyn Tucker and John Grim (Lewisburg, Pa.: Bucknell University Press, 1993; reissued, Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1994).
Return to text

19 This history has been described more fully by Roderick Nash in his chapter entitled, “The Greening of Religion,” in The Rights of Nature: A History of Environmental Ethics (Madison, Wisc.: University of Wisconsin Press, 1989).
Return to text

20 Eugene Hargrove, ed., Religion and Environmental Crisis (Athens, Ga.: University of Georgia Press, 1986).
Return to text

21 Charlene Spretnak, States of Grace: The Recovery of Meaning in the Post-Modern Age (San Francisco, Calif.: Harper San Francisco, 1991).
Return to text

22 Steven Rockefeller and John Elder, eds., Spirit and Nature: Why the Environment Is a Religious Issue (Boston: Beacon Press, 1992).
Return to text

23 Peter Marshall, Nature’s Web: Rethinking Our Place on Earth(Armonk, N.Y.: M. E. Sharpe, 1992).
Return to text

24 Tucker and Grim, eds. Worldviews and Ecology.
Return to text

25 Callicott, Earth’s Insights.
Return to text

26 Both are State University of New York Press publications.
Return to text

27 David Kinsley, Ecology and Religion: Ecological Spirituality in a Cross-Cultural Perspective (Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 1995).
Return to text

28 Seyyed Hossein Nasr, Religion and the Order of Nature (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996).
Return to text

29 J. Ronald Engel and Joan Gibb Engel, eds. Ethics of Environment and Development: Global Challenge, International Response (Tucson, Ariz.: University of Arizona Press, 1990).
Return to text

30 Harold Coward, ed., Population, Consumption, and the Environment: Religious and Secular Responses (Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1995).
Return to text

31 Roger S. Gottlieb, ed. This Sacred Earth: Religion, Nature, Environment (New York: Routledge, 1996).
Return to text

32 These include volumes on Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.
Return to text

 

Copyright © 1997 Center for the Study of World Religions, Harvard Divinity School.
Reprinted with permission.