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Bibliography - Part 1

 

Duncan Ryuken Williams
Trinity College


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Abe, Masao. “Man and Nature in Christianity and Buddhism.” Japanese Religions 7, no. 1 (July 1971): 1–10.

Abraham, Ralph. “Orphism: The Ancient Roots of Green Buddhism.” In Dharma
Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology,
ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 39–49. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.

Aitken, Robert. The Practice of Perfection: The Paramitas from A Zen Buddhist Perspective. New York: Pantheon, 1994.
________. “Right Livelihood for the Western Buddhist.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 227–32. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990. Reprinted in Primary Point 7, no. 2 (summer 1990): 19–22.
________. “Gandhi, Dogen, and Deep Ecology.” In Deep Ecology: Living As If Nature Mattered, eds. Bill Devall and George Sessions, 232–35. Salt Lake City, Utah: Peregrine Smith Books, 1985. Reprinted in The Path of Compassion: Writings on Socially Engaged Buddhism, ed. Fred Eppsteiner, 86–92 (Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1988).
________. The Mind of Clover: Essays in Zen Buddhist Ethics. San Francisco, Calif.: North Point Press, 1984.

Almon, Bert. “Buddhism and Energy in the Recent Poetry of Gary Snyder.” Mosaic 11 (1977): 117–25.

Anderson, Bill. “The Use of Animals in Science: A Buddhist Perspective.” Zen Bow Newsletter 6, no. 2–3 (summer-fall 1984): 8–9.

Ariyaratne, A. T., and Joanna Macy. “The Island of Temple and Tank. Sarvodaya: Self-help in Sri Lanka.” In Buddhism and Ecology, eds. Martine Batchelor and Kerry Brown, 78–86. London: Cassell, 1992.

Badiner, Allan Hunt. ed. Mindfulness in the Marketplace: Compassionate Responses to Consumerism. Berkeley: Parallax Press, 2002.
________. “Is the Buddha Winking at Extinction?” Tricycle 3, no. 2 (winter 1993): 52–54.
________., ed. Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.
________. “Dharma Gaia: The Green Roots of American Buddhism.” Vajradhatu Sun, April-May 1988, 7.

Balsys, Bodo. Ahimsa: Buddhism and the Vegetarian Ideal. New Delhi: Munshiram Manoharlal Publications, 2004.

Barash, David P. “Buddhism and the ‘Subversive Science’.” The Chronicle of Higher Education 47, no. 24 (2001): B13-B14.
________. “The Ecologist as Zen Master.” American Midland Naturalist 89, no. 1 (January 1973): 214–17.

Bari, Judi. “We All Live Here: An Interview with Judi Bari.” By Susan Moon. Turning Wheel (spring 1994): 16–19.

Barnhill, David L. “A Giant Act of Love: Reflections on the First Precept.” Tricycle 2, no. 3 (spring 1993): 29–33.
________. “Indra’s Net as Food Chain: Gary Snyder’s Ecological Vision.” Ten Directions (spring-summer 1990): 20–28.

Barnhill, David, and Roger Gottlieb, eds. Deep Ecology and World Religions: New Essays on Sacred Ground. Albany, NY: SUNY, 2001.

Batchelor, Martine, ed. “Even the Stones Smile: Selections from the Scriptures.” In Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Martine Batchelor and Kerry Brown, 2–17. London: Cassell, 1992.

Batchelor, Martine and Kerry Brown, eds. Buddhism and Ecology. London: Cassell, 1992.

Batchelor, Stephen. “The Sands of the Ganges: Notes Toward a Buddhist Ecological Philosophy.” In Buddhism and Ecology, eds. Martine Batchelor and Kerry Brown, 31–39. London: Cassell, 1992.
________. “Buddhist Economics Reconsidered.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 178–82. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.
________. “Images of Ecology.” Primary Point 7, no. 2 (summer 1990): 9–11.

Bilimoria, Purushottama. “Buddha, fifth century BCE.” In Fifty Key Thinkers on the Environment, ed. Joy A. Palmer. New York: Routledge, 2001, 1-7.

Birch, Pru. “Individual Responsibility and the Greenhouse Effect.” Golden Drum: A Magazine for Western Buddhists, February-April 1990, 10–11.

Bloom, Alfred. “Buddhism and Ecological Perspective.” Ecology Center Newsletter, December 1989, 1–2.
________. “Buddhism, Nature, and the Environment.” Eastern Buddhist, n.s., 5, no. 1 (May 1972): 115–29.

Brown, Brian Edward. “Buddhism in Ecological Perspective.” Pacific World, n.s., 6 (fall 1990): 65–73.

Bruun, Ole and Arne Kalland, eds. Asian Perceptions of Nature: A Critical Approach. Richmond, Surrey: Nordic Institute of Asian Studies, 1995.

Buddhadasa Bhikkhu. “A Notion of Buddhist Ecology.” Seeds of Peace 2 (1987): 22–27.

Burkill, I. H. “On the Dispersal of the Plants Most Intimate to Buddhism.” Journal of the Arnold Arboretum 27, no. 4 (1946): 327–39.

Byers, Bruce A. “Toward an Ecocentric Community: From Ego-self to Eco-self.” Turning Wheel, spring 1992, 39–40.

Calderazzo, John. “Meditation in a Thai Forest.” Audubon, January-February 1991, 84–91.

Chapple, Christopher Key. “Jainism and Buddhism.” In A Companion to Environmental Philosophy, ed. Dale Jamieson, 52-66. Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 2001.
________. “Toward an Indigenous Indian Environmentalism.” In Purifying the Earthly Body of God: Religion and Ecology in Hindu India, ed. Lance Nelson, 13–37. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1998.
________. Nonviolence to Animals, Earth, and Self in Asian Traditions. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1993.
________.“Noninjury to Animals: Jaina and Buddhist Perspective.” In Animal Sacrifices: Religious Perspectives on the Use of Animals in Science, ed. Tom Regan, 213-235. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1986. Revised version printed as “Nonviolence to Animals in Buddhism and Jainism.” In Inner Peace, World Peace: Essays on Buddhism and Nonviolence, ed. by Kenneth Kraft, 49-62. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1992.

Codiga, Doug. “Zen Practice and a Sense of Place.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 106–11. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.

Colt, Ames B. “Perceiving the World as Self: The Emergence of an Environmental Ethic.” Primary Point 7, no. 2 (summer 1990): 12–14.

Cook, Francis. “The Jewel Net of Indra.” In Nature in Asian Traditions of Thought: Essays in Environmental Philosophy, eds. J. Baird Callicott and Roger T. Ames, 213–29. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1989.
________. “Dogen’s View of Authentic Selfhood and Its Socio-ethical Implications.” In Dogen Studies, ed. William R. LaFleur, 131–49. Honolulu, Hawaii: University of Hawaii Press, 1985.
________. Hua-yen Buddhism: The Jewel Net of Indra. University Park, Pa.: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1977.

Cooper, David E., and Simon P. James. Buddhism, Virtue and the Environment. Hampshire: Ashgate Publishing, 2005.

Cooper, David E. and Joy A. Palmer, eds. Spirit of the Environment: Religion, Value and Environmental Concern. New York: Routledge, 1998.

Coward, Harold, ed. Visions of a New Earth: Religious Perspectives on Population, Consumption, and Ecology. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 2000.

Crawford, Cromwell. “The Buddhist Response to Health and Disease in Environmental Perspective.” In Radical Conservatism: Buddhism in the Contemporary World: Articles in Honour of Bhikkhu Buddhadasa’s 84th Birthday Anniversary, 162–71. Bangkok: Thai Inter-Religious Commission for Development/International Network of Engaged Buddhists, 1990. Reprinted in Buddhist Ethics and Modern Society, eds. Charles Wei-hsun Fu and Sandra A. Wawrytko, 185–93 (New York: Greenwood Press, 1991).

Cry from the Forest: A “Buddhism and Ecology” Community Learning Tool. Phnom Penh, Cambodia: Buddhist Institute, NGO Working Group for Non-formal Monk Environmental Education Project (MEEP), UNDP-ETAP, and UNESCO, 1999. (http://www.camdev.org/uploads/1/6/7/3/16732806/cry-english-revised-for-printing.pdf)

Currier, Lavinia. “Report from Rio: The Earth Summit.” Tricycle 2, no. 1 (fall 1992): 24–26.

Curtin, Deane. “Dogen, Deep Ecology, and the Ecological Self.” Environmental Ethics 16, no. 2 (summer 1994): 195–213.

Dalai Lama. Foreword to Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.
________. “Buddhism and the Protection of Nature: An Ethical Approach to Environmental Protection.” Buddhist Peace Fellowship Newsletter, spring 1988.

Darlington, Susan Marie. “Practical Spirituality and Community Forests: Monks, Ritual and Radical Conservativism in Thailand.” In Nature in the Global South: Environmental Projects in South and Southeast Asia, eds. Paul Greenough and Anna L. Tsing, 347-366. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2003.
________. “The Spirit(s) of Conservation in Buddhist Thailand.” In Nature Across Cultures: Views of Nature and the Environment in Non-Western Cultures, ed. Helaine Selin, 129-145. Boston: Kluwer Academic Press, 2003.
________. “Rethinking Buddhism and Development: The Emergence of Environmental Monks in Thailand.” Journal of Buddhist Ethics 7(2000):1-14. Republished as “Buddhism and Development: The Ecology Monks of Thailand.” In Action Dharma: New Studies in Engaged Buddhism, eds. Christopher Queen, Charles Prebish, and Damien Keown, 96-109. London, UK: RoutledgeCurzon Press, 2003.
________. “Monks and Environmental Action in Thailand.” Buddhist Forum, 1994.
________. “Monks and Environmental Conservation: A Case Study in Nan Province.” Seeds of Peace 9, no. 1 (January-April 1993): 7–10.
________. “Buddhism, Morality, and Change: The Local Response to Development in Northern Thailand.” Ph.D. diss., University of Michigan, 1990.

Davies, Shann, ed. Tree of Life: Buddhism and the Protection of Nature. Hong Kong: Buddhist Perception of Nature Project, 1987.

De Silva, Lily. “The Hills Wherein My Soul Delights: Exploring the Stories and Teachings.” In Buddhism and Ecology, eds. Martine Batchelor and Kerry Brown, 18–30. London: Cassell, 1992.
________. “The Buddhist Attitude Toward Nature.” In Buddhist Perspectives on the Ecocrisis, ed. Klas Sandell, 9–29. Sri Lanka: Buddhist Publication Society, 1987.

De Silva, Padmasiri. “Environmental Ethics: A Buddhist Perspective.” In Buddhist Ethics and Modern Society: An International Symposium, eds. Charles Wei-hsun Fu and Sandra A. Wawrytko, 173–84. Contributions to the Study of Religion, no. 31. New York: Greenwood Press, 1991.
________. “Buddhist Environmental Ethics.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 14–19. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.

del Raye, Bonnie. “Buddhists Concerned for Animals.” In Turning the Wheel: American Women Creating the New Buddhism, ed. Sandy Boucher, 289–94. San Francisco, Calif.: Harper and Row, 1988.

Devall, Bill. “Ecocentric Sangha.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 155–64. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.
________. Simple in Means, Rich in Ends: Practicing Deep Ecology. Salt Lake City, Utah: Peregrine Smith, 1988.

Devall, Bill and George Sessions. Deep Ecology: Living As If Nature Mattered. Salt Lake City, Utah: Peregrine Smith, 1985.

Dhamma Bhikkhu Rewata. “Buddhism and the Environment.” In Radical Conservatism: Buddhism in the Contemporary World: Articles in Honour of Bhikkhu Buddhadasa’s 84th Birthday Anniversary, 156–61. Bangkok: Thai Inter-Religious Commission for Development/International Network of Engaged Buddhists, 1990.

Donegan, Patricia. “Haiku and the Ecotastrophe.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 197–207. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.

Dutt, Denise Manci. “An Integration of Zen Buddhism and the Study of Person and Environment.” Ph.D. diss., California Institute of Integral Studies, 1983.

Duval, R. Shannon, and David Shaner. “Conservation Ethics and the Japanese Intellectual Tradition.” Conservation Ethics 11 (fall 1989): 197–214.

Dwivedi, O. P., ed. World Religions and the Environment. New Delhi, India: Gilanjal Publishing House, 1989.

Earhart, H. Byron. “The Ideal of Nature in Japanese Religion and Its Possible Significance for Environmental Concerns.” Contemporary Religions in Japan 11, nos. 1–2 (March-June 1970): 1–25.

Ehrlich, Gretel. “Pico Iyer Talks With Gretel Ehrlich: Buddhist at the Edge of the Earth.” Tricycle 5, no. 3 (spring 1996): 77–82.

Einarsen, John., ed. The Sacred Mountains of Asia. Boston: Shambhala Press, 1995.

Eppsteiner, Fred., ed. The Path of Compassion: Writings on Socially Engaged Buddhism. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1988.

Fields, Rick. “The Very Short Sutra on the Meeting of the Buddha and the Goddess.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 3–7. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.
________. “A Council of All Beings.” Yoga Journal (November-December 1989): 52, 108.

Fitzsymonds, Sue. “Treading Softly on This Earth.” Golden Drum: A Magazine for Western Buddhists, February-April 1990, 12.

Foltz, Richard. Worldviews, Religion, and the Environment. Belmont, CA: Thomson/Wadsworth, 2003.

Fossey, Kevin, Somdech Preah Maha Ghosananda, Sri Kushok Bakula, and Nhem Kim Teng. “Buddhism.” Faith in Conservation: New Approaches to Religion and the Environment, eds. Martin Palmer and Victoria Finlay, 77-82. Washington, D.C.: The World Bank, 2003.

Franke, Joe. “The Tiger in the Forest: A Walk with the Monk Who Ordained Trees.” Shambhala Sun 4, no. 2 (November 1995): 48–53.

Gates, Barbara. “Reflections of an Aspiring Earth-Steward.” Inquiring Mind 7, no. 2 (spring 1991): 18–19.

Getz, Andrew. “A Natural Being: A Monk’s Reforestation Project in Thailand.” Buddhist Peace Fellowship Newsletter, winter 1991, 24–25.

Giryo, Yanase. O Buddha! A Desperate Cry from a Dying World. Nagoya, Japan: KWIX, 1986.
________ . An Appeal for Your Help in Halting World Environmental Destruction Now for Future Generations. (Information may be obtained from: Jiko-bukkyo-kai, Okaguchi 2 chome 3–47, Gojo, Nara Prefecture, Japan 637.)

Gold, Ann Grodzins. “Children and Trees in North India.” Worldviews: Environment, Culture, Religion 6, no. 3 (2002): 276-299.

Gosling, David L. Religion and Ecology in India and Southeast Asia. London: Routledge, 2001.

Grady, Carla Deicke. “A Buddhist Response to Modernization in Thailand: With Particular Reference to Conservation Forest Monks.” Ph.D. diss., University of Hawaii, 1995.
________. “Women and Ecocentric Conscience.” Newsletter on International Buddhist Women’s Activities 21 (October 1989). Reprinted as “Women and Ecocentricity,” in Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 165–68 (Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990).

Granoff, Phyllis. “The Violence of Non-Violence: A Study of Some Jain Responses to Non-Jain Religious Practices.” Journal of the International Association of Buddhist Studies 15, no. 1 (1992): 1–43.

Gray, Dennis D. “Buddhism Being Used to Help Save Asia’s Environment.” Seeds of Peace 2 (1987): 24–26.

Grosnick, William Henry. “The Buddhahood of the Grasses and the Trees: Ecological Sensitivity or Scriptural Misunderstanding.” In An Ecology of the Spirit: Religious Reflection and Environmental Consciousness, ed. Michael Barnes, 197–208. Lanham, Md.: University Press of America, 1994.

Gross, Rita. “Toward A Buddhist Environmental Ethic.” Journal of the American Academy of Religion 65, no. 2 (summer 1997): 333–53.

Halifax, Joan. The Fruitful Darkness: Reconnecting with the Body of the Earth. San Francisco, Calif.: HarperSanFrancisco, 1993.
________. “The Third Body: Buddhism, Shamanism, and Deep Ecology.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 20–38. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.

Hannan, Pete. “Images and Animals.” Golden Drum: A Magazine for Western Buddhists, August-October 1989, 8–9.

Harris, Ian. “Buddhist Causation, Dysteology and Environmental Ethics.” Ecology and Asian Religions, ed. Lance Nelson. Albany, NY: State University Press of New York, 2000.
________. “Buddhism and Ecology.” Contemporary Buddhist Ethics, ed. Damien Keown, 113-136. London, England: Curzon Press, 2000.
________. “Buddhist Environmental Ethics and Detraditionalization: The Case of EcoBuddhism.” Religion 25, no. 3 (July 1995): 199–211.
________. “Getting to Grips with Buddhist Environmentalism: A Provisional Typology.” Journal of Buddhist Ethics 2 (1995): 173–90.
________. “Causation and ‘Telos’: The Problem of Buddhist Environmental Ethics.” Journal of Buddhist Ethics 1 (1994): 46–59.
________. “How Environmentalist Is Buddhism?” Religion 21 (April 1991): 101–114.

Harvey, Peter. “Attitude to and Treatment of the Natural World.” An Introduction to Buddhist Ethics, 150-186. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press, 2000.

Hayward, Jeremy. “Ecology and the Experience of Sacredness.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 64–74. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.

Head, Suzanne. “Creating Space for Nature.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 112–27. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.
________. “Buddhism and Deep Ecology.” Vajradhatu Sun, April-May 1988, 7–8, 12.

Henning, Daniel H. Buddhism and Deep Ecology. Bloomington: AuthorHouse Press, 2002.

Ho, Mobi. “Animal Dharma.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 129–35. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.

Hope, Marjorie and James Young. “Buddhism.” Voices of Hope in the Struggle to Save the Planet, 245-280. Croton-on-Hudson, NY: Apex Press, 2000.

Htun, Nay. “The State of the Environment Today: The Needs for Tomorrow.” In Tree of Life: Buddhism and the Protection of Nature, ed. Shann Davies, 19–29. Hong Kong: Buddhist Perception of Nature Project, 1987.

Hughes, James., ed. Green Buddhist Declaration. Moratuwa: Sarvodaya Press, 1984. (Information may be obtained from: 98 Rawatawatte Rd., Moratuwa, Sri Lanka.)

Ikeda, Daisaku. “Man in Nature.” In Dialogue on Life 1, 26–56. Tokyo: Nichiren Shoshu International Center, 1976. Reprinted in Life: An Enigma, A Precious Jewel, trans. Charles S. Terry, 28–46 (Tokyo and New York: Kodansha International, 1982).
________. “Life and the Environment.” In Dialogue on Life, vol. 2, 78–90. Tokyo: Nichiren Shoshu International Center, 1977.

Inada, Kenneth K. “Environmental Problematics.” In Nature in Asian Traditions of Thought: Essays in Environmental Philosophy, eds. J. Baird Callicott and Roger T. Ames, 231–45. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1989.

Ingram, Catherine. In the Footsteps of Gandhi: Conversations with Spiritual Social Activists. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.

Ingram, Paul O. “Nature’s Jeweled Net: Kukai’s Ecological Buddhism.” Pacific World 6 (1990): 50–64.

Inoue, Shin’ichi. Putting Buddhism to Work: A New Theory of Management and Business, trans. Duncan Williams. Tokyo: Kodansha International, 1997.

Jacobsen Knut A. Prakrti in Samkhya-Yoga: Material Principle, Religious Experience, Ethical Implications. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, 1999.

Jaini, Padmanabh S. “Indian Perspectives on the Spirituality of Animals.” In Buddhist Philosophy and Culture: Essays in Honour of N. A. Jayawickrema, eds. David J. Kalupahana and W. G. Weeraratne, 169–78. Colombo: N. A. Jayawickrema Felicitation Volume Committee, 1987.

James, Simon P. Zen Buddhism and Environmental Ethics. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2004.
________. “‘Thing-Centered’ Holism in Buddhism, Heidegger, and Deep Ecology.” Environmental Ethics 22 (2000): 359-375.

Jayaprabha. “Ethics and Imagination.” Golden Drum: A Magazine for Western Buddhists, August-October 1989, 10–11.

Johnson, Wendy. “Daughters of the Wind.” Tricycle 6, no. 3 (spring 1997): 90–91.
________. “Planting Paradise.” Tricycle 6, no. 4 (summer 1997): 85.
________. “Spring Weeds.” Tricycle 5, no. 3 (spring 1996): 92–93.
________. “The Tree at the Bottom of Time.” Tricycle 5, no. 2 (winter 1995): 98–99.
________. “Tree Planting at Green Gulch Farm.” Inquiring Mind 7, no. 2 (spring 1991): 15.

Jenkins, T. N. “Chinese Traditional Thought and Practice: Lessons for an Ecological Economics Worldview.” Ecological Economics 40, no. 1 (2002): 39-52.

Johnston, Lucas. “The ‘Nature’ of Buddhism: A Survey of Relevant Literature and Themes.” Worldviews: Environment, Culture, Religion 10, no. 1 (2006): 69-99.

Jones, Ken. Beyond Optimism: A Buddhist Political Ecology. Oxford: Jon Carpenter, 1993.
________. “Getting Out of Our Own Light.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 183–90. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.
________. The Social Face of Buddhism: An Approach to Political and Social Activism. London: Wisdom Publications, 1989.
________. “Enlightened Ecological Engagement.” Buddhist Peace Fellowship Newsletter 10, nos. 3–4 (fall 1988): 32.

Jung, Hwa Yol. “Ecology, Zen, and Western Religious Thought.” Christian Century, 15 November 1972, 1153–56.
________. “The Ecological Crisis: A Philosophic Perspective, East and West.” Bucknell Review 20, no. 3 (winter 1972): 25–44.

Jung, Hwa Yol., and Petee Jung. “Gary Snyder’s Ecopiety.” Environmental History Review 41, no. 3 (1990): 75–87.

Jurs, Cynthia. “Earth Treasure Vases: Eco-Buddhists Bring an Ancient Teaching from Tibet to Help Heal the Land.” Tricycle 6, no. 4 (summer 1997): 68–69.

Kabilsingh, Chatsumarn. “Buddhist Monks and Forest Conservation.” In Radical Conservatism: Buddhism in the Contemporary World: Articles in Honour of Bhikkhu Buddhadasa’s 84th Birthday Anniversary, 301–10. Bangkok: Thai Inter-Religious Commission for Development/International Network of Engaged Buddhists, 1990.
________. “Early Buddhist Views on Nature.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 8–13. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.
________. “How Buddhism Can Help Protect Nature.” In Tree of Life: Buddhism and Protection of Nature, ed. Shann Davies, 7–15. Hong Kong: Buddhist Perception of Nature Project, 1987. Reprinted in Vajradhatu Sun, April-May 1988, 9, 20.
________. A Cry from the Forest: Buddhist Perception of Nature, A New Perspective for Conservation Education. Bangkok: Wildlife Fund Thailand, 1987.

Kalupahana, David J. “Toward a Middle Path of Survival.” Environmental Ethics 8, no. 4 (winter 1986): 371–80. Reprinted in Nature in Asian Traditions of Thought: Essays in Environmental Philosophy, eds. J. Baird Callicott and Roger T. Ames, 247–56 (Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1989).

Kapleau, Philip. “Animals and Buddhism.” Zen Bow Newsletter 5, no. 2 (spring 1983): 1–9.
________. To Cherish All Life: A Buddhist Case for Becoming Vegetarian. San Francisco, Calif.: Harper and Row, 1982.

Karunamaya. “The Whys and Hows of Becoming a Vegetarian.” Golden Drum: A Magazine for Western Buddhists, August-October 1989, 12–13.

Kaye, Lincoln. “Of Cabbages and Cultures: Buddhist ‘Greens’ Aim to Oust Thailand’s Hilltribes.” Far Eastern Economic Review, 13 December 1990, 35–37.

Kaza, Stephanie. “Penetrating the Tangle.” In Hooked! Buddhist Writings on Greed, Desire, and the Urge to Consume, ed. Stephanie Kaza, 139-151. Boston: Shambhala Publications, 2005. (http://www.uvm.edu/~skaza/publications/assets/tangle.pdf)
________. “Western Buddhist Motivations for Vegetarianism.” Worldviews: Environment, Culture, Religion 9, no. 3 (2005): 385-411.
________. “Green Buddhism.” In When Worlds Converge: What Science and Religion Tell Us About the Story of the Universe and Our Place in It, eds. Clifford N. Matthews, Mary Evelyn Tucker, and Philip Hefner, 293-309. Peru, IL: Carus Publishing Company, 2002.
________. “To Save All Beings: Buddhist Environmental Activism.” In Engaged Buddhism in the West, ed. Christopher S. Queen, 159-183. Boston: Wisdom Publications, 2000. (http://www.uvm.edu/~skaza/publications/assets/saveallbeings.pdf)
________. “Keeping Peace with Nature.” In Buddhist Peacework: Creating Cultures of Peace, ed. David W. Chappell, 81–91. Boston: Wisdom Publications, 1999.
________. “The Gridlock of Domination: A Buddhist Response to Environmental Suffering.” In The Greening of Faith: God, the Environment, and the Good Life, ed. John E. Carroll, et al., 141–57. Hanover, N.H.: University Press of New England, 1997.
________. “Conversation with Trees: Toward an Ecologically Engaged Spirituality.” ReVision 15, no. 3 (winter 1993): 128–36.
________. “Acting with Compassion: Buddhism, Feminism, and the Environmental Crisis.” In Ecofeminism and the Sacred, ed. Carol J. Adams, 50–69. New York: Continuum, 1993.
________. The Attentive Heart: Conversations with Trees. New York: Ballantine Books, 1993.
________. “Buddhism and Ecology: Suggested Reading.” Inquiring Mind 7, no. 2 (spring 1991): 20.
________. “Toward A Buddhist Environmental Ethic.” Buddhism at the Crossroads 6, no. 4 (fall 1990): 22–25.
________. “Emptiness As a Basis for An Environmental Ethic.” Buddhist Peace Fellowship Newsletter, spring 1990, 30–31.

Kaza, Stephanie, and Kenneth Kraft, eds. Dharma Rain: Sources of Buddhist Environmentalism. Boston: Shambhala Publications, 2000.

Ketudat, Sippanondha, et al. The Middle Path for the Future of Thailand: Technology in Harmony with Culture and Environment. Honolulu, Hawaii: Institute of Culture and Communication, East-West Center; Chiang Mai: Faculty of the Social Sciences, Chiang Mai University, 1990.

Keyser, Christine. “Endangered Tibet: Report from a Conference on Tibetan Ecology.” Vajradhatu Sun, December 1990–January 1991, 1, 12.

Khoroche, Peter, trans. Once the Buddha Was a Monkey: Arya Sura’s Jatakamala. Chicago, Ill.: University of Chicago Press, 1989.

Komito, David. “Madhyamika, Tantra, and ‘Green Buddhism.’” Pacific World 8 (1992).

Kraft, Kenneth. “The Greening of Buddhist Practice.” Zen Quarterly 5, no. 4 (winter 1994): 11–14. Reprinted in This Sacred Earth: Religion, Nature, Environment, ed. Roger S. Gottlieb, 484–98 (New York: Routledge, 1996).

Kraus, James W. “Gary Snyder’s Biopoetics: A Study of the Poet as Ecologist.” Ph.D. diss., University of Hawaii, 1986.

LaFleur, William R. “Sattva—Enlightenment for Plants and Trees.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 136–44. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.
________. “Saigyo and the Buddhist Value of Nature.” Parts 1 and 2. History of Religions 13, no. 2 (November 1973): 93–127; no. 3 (February 1974): 227–47. Reprinted in Nature in Asian Traditions of Thought: Essays in Environmental Philosophy, eds. J. Baird Callicott and Roger T. Ames, 183–209 (Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1989).

Lakanaricharan, Sureerat. “The State and Buddhist Philosophy in Resource Conflicts and Conservation in Northern Thailand.” Ph.D. diss., University of California, Berkeley, California, 1995.

Langford, Donald Stewart. “The Primacy of Place in Gary Snyder’s Ecological Vision.” Ph.D. diss., Ohio State University, 1993.

Larson, Gerald James. “‘Conceptual Resources’ in South Asia for ‘Environmental Ethics.’” In Nature in Asian Traditions of Thought: Essays in Environmental Philosophy, ed. J. Baird Callicott and Roger T. Ames, 267–77. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1989.

Lesco, Phillip A. “To Do No Harm: A Buddhist View on Animal Use in Research.” Journal of Religion and Health 27 (winter 1988): 307–12.

Levitt, Peter. “For the Trees.” Ten Directions (spring-summer 1993): 34–35. Reprinted in Turning Wheel (spring 1994): 25–26.
________. “An Intimate View.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 93–96. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.

Ling, T. O. “Buddhist Factors in Population Growth and Control: A Survey Conducted in Thailand and Ceylon.” Population Studies 23, no. 1 (March 1969): 53–60.

Lodrick, Deryck O. Sacred Cows, Sacred Places: Origins and Survivals of Animal Homes in India. Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 1981.

Lohmann, Larry. “Visitors to the Commons: Approaching Thailand’s ‘Environmental’ Struggles from a Western Starting Point.” In Ecological Resistance Movements: The Global Emergence of Radical and Popular Environmentalism, ed. Bron Raymond Taylor, 109–26. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1995.
________. “Green Orientalism.” Ecologist 23, no. 6 (1993): 202–204.
________. “Who Defends Biological Diversity? Conservation Strategies and the Case of Thailand.” In Biodiversity: Social and Ecological Perspectives, ed. Vandana Shiva, 77–104. Penang: World Rainforest Movement; London: Zed, 1991.

Loori, John Daido. Teachings of the Insentient: Zen and the Environment. Mt. Tremper: Dharma Communications Press, 1999.
________. “River Seeing the River.” Mountain Record (spring 1996): 2–10.
________. “Being Born As the Earth: Excerpts from a Spirited Dharma Combat with John Daido Loori.” Mountain Record (winter 1992): 14–18.
________. “The Sacred Teachings of Wilderness: A Dharma Discourse on the Living Mandala of Mountains and Rivers.” Mountain Record (winter 1992): 2–9.
________. “Born As the Earth.” Mountain Record (winter 1991): 2–10.

Loy, David R. “Loving the World As Our Own Body: The Nondualist Ethic of Taoism, Buddhism, and Deep Ecology.” The Great Awakening: A Buddhist Social Theory, 171-194. Boston: Wisdom Publications, 2003.

Macy, Joanna. “Schooling Our Intention.” Tricycle 3, no. 2 (winter 1993): 48–51.
________. World as Lover, World as Self. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1991.
________. “The Ecological Self: Postmodern Ground for Right Action.” In Sacred Interconnections: Postmodern Spirituality, Political Economy, and Art, ed. David Ray Griffin, 35–48. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1990.
________. “The Greening of the Self.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 53–63. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.
________. “Guardians of Gaia.” Yoga Journal (November-December 1989): 53–55.
________. “Empowerment beyond Despair: A Talk by Joanna Macy on the Greening of the Self.” Vajradhatu Sun 11, no. 4 (April-May 1989): 1, 3, 14.
________. “Deep Ecology and Spiritual Practice.” One Earth (autumn 1989): 18–21.
________. “In Indra’s Net.” In The Path of Compassion: Writings on Socially Engaged Buddhism, ed. Fred Eppsteiner, 170–81. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1988.
________. “Sacred Waste.” Buddhist Peace Fellowship Newsletter 10, no. 3–4 (fall 1988): 22–23.
________. Dharma and Development: Religion as Resource in the Sarvodaya Self-Help Movement. Rev. ed. West Hartford, Conn.: Kumarian Press, 1985.
________. “Interdependence in the Nuclear Age: An Interview with Joanna Macy by Stephan Bodian.” Karuna (fall 1985): 8–9.
________. Despair and Personal Power in the Nuclear Age. Philadelphia, Pa.: New Society Publishers, 1983.

Macy, Joanna, and Molly Young Brown. Coming Back to Life: Practices to Reconnect Our Lives, Our World. Gabriola Island, B.C.: New Society Publishers, 1998.

Maezumi, Taizan. “A Half Dipper of Water.” Ten Directions (spring-summer 1990): 11–12.
_______. “The Buddha Seed Grows Consciously: The Precept of Non-killing.” Ten Directions, spring 1985, 1, 4.

Martin, Julia, ed. Ecological Responsibility: A Dialogue With Buddhism. Delhi, India: Tibet House, 1997.

McClellan, John. “Nondual Ecology.” Tricycle 3, no. 2 (winter 1993): 58–65.

McDaniel, Jay B. “Revisioning God and the Self: Lessons from Buddhism.” In Liberating Life: Contemporary Approaches to Ecological Theology, eds. Charles Birch, William Eakin, and Jay B. McDaniel, 228–57. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1990.

McDermott, James P. “Animals and Humans in Early Buddhism.” Indo-Iranian Journal 32, no. 2 (1989): 269–80.

Metzger, Deena. “Four Meditations.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 209–12. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.
________. “The Buddha of the Beasts.” Creation, May-June 1989, 25.

Mininberg, Mark Sando. “Sitting with the Environment.” Mountain Record (winter 1993): 44–47.

Miyakawa, Akira. “Man and Nature or in Nature?” Dharma World 21 (March-April 1994): 47–49.

Morgante, Amy, ed. Buddhist Perspectives on the Earth Charter. Cambridge, Mass.: Boston Research Center for the 21st Century, 1997.

Mossley, David J. “Bash?, 1644-94.” In Fifty Key Thinkers on the Environment, ed. Joy A. Palmer, 51-56. New York: Routledge, 2001.

Naess, Arne. “Mountains and Mythology.” In The Sacred Mountains of Asia, ed. John Einarsen, 89. Boston: Shambhala Press, 1995.
________. “Self-Realization: An Ecological Approach to Being in the World.” In Thinking Like a Mountain: Toward a Council of All Beings, eds. John Seed, Joanna Macy, and Arne Naess, 19–30. Philadelphia, Pa.: New Society Publishers, 1988.
________. “Interview with Arne Naess.” In Deep Ecology: Living As If Nature Mattered, eds. Bill Duvall and George Sessions, 74–76. Salt Lake City, Utah: Peregrine Smith, 1985.

Nagabodhi. “Buddhism and the Environment.” Golden Drum: A Magazine for Western Buddhists, February-April 1990, 3.
________. “Buddhism and Vegetarianism.” Golden Drum: A Magazine for Western Buddhists, August-October 1989, 3.

Naravan, Raideva and Janardan Kumar, eds. Ecology and Religion: Ecological Concepts in Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Islam, Christianity and Sikhism. In Collaboration with Institute for Socio-Legal Studies, Muzaffarpur, Bihar. New Delhi: Deep & Deep Publications Pvt. Ltd., 2003.

Nash, Nancy. “The Buddhist Perception of Nature Project.” In Tree of Life: Buddhism and the Protection of Nature, ed. Shann Davies, 31–33. Hong Kong: Buddhist Perception of Nature Project, 1987.

Natadecha-Sponsel, Poranee. “Nature and Culture in Thailand: The Implementation of Cultural Ecology and Environmental Education through the Application of Behavioral Sociology.” Ph.D. diss., University of Hawaii, 1991.
________. “Buddhist Religion and Scientific Ecology as Convergent Perceptions of Nature.” In Essays on Perceiving Nature, ed. Diana M. DeLuca, 113–18. Honolulu, Hawaii: Perceiving Nature Conference Committee, 1988.

Newbury, Roxy Keien. “The Green Container: Taking Care of the Garbage.” Mountain Record, winter 1991, 51–53.

Nhat Hanh, Thich. Love in Action: Writings on Nonviolent Social Change. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1993.
________. “Look Deep and Smile: The Thoughts and Experiences of a Vietnamese Monk.” In Buddhism and Ecology, eds. Martine Batchelor and Kerry Brown, 100–109. London: Cassell, 1992.
________. Peace Is Every Step: The Path of Mindfulness in Everyday Life, ed. Arnold Kotler. New York: Bantam, 1991.
________. “The Last Tree.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 217–21. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.
________. “Seeing All Beings with the Eyes of Compassion.” Karuna: A Journal of Buddhist Meditation (summer-fall 1990): 6–10.
________. “The Individual, Society, and Nature.” In The Path of Compassion: Writings on Socially Engaged Buddhism, ed. Fred Eppsteiner, 40–46. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1988.
________. Interbeing: Commentaries on the Tiep Hien Precepts. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1987.
________. Being Peace. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1987.

Nhat Hanh, Thich, et al. A Joyful Path: Community Transformation and Peace. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1994.
________. For a Future to Be Possible: Commentaries on the Five Wonderful Precepts. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1993.

Nisker, Wes. Buddha’s Nature: A Practical Guide to Discovering Your Place in the Cosmos. New York: Bantam Books, 1998.

Nolan, Kathy Fusho. “The Great Earth.” Mountain Record (spring 1996): 70–72.

Norberg-Hodge, Helena. “May a Hundred Plants Grow from One Seed: The Ecological Tradition of Ladakh Meets the Future.” In Buddhism and Ecology, eds. Martine Batchelor and Kerry Brown, 41–54. London: Cassell, 1992.
________. Ancient Futures: Learning from Ladakh. San Francisco, Calif.: Sierra Club Books, 1991.

Ophuls, William. “Buddhist Politics.” Ecologist 7, no. 3 (1977): 82–86.

O'Reilley, Mary Rose. The Barn at the End of the World: The Apprenticeship of a Quaker, Buddhist Shepherd. Minneapolis: Milkweed Editions, 2000.

Page, Tony. Buddhism and Animals: A Buddhist Vision of Humanity's Rightful Relationship with the Animal Kingdom. London: UVAKIS Publications, 1999.

Palmer, Martin and Victoria Finlay. Faith in Conservation: New Approaches to Religions and the Environment. Washington, DC: The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/ The World Bank, 2003.

Pauling, Chris. “A Buddhist Life Is a Green Life.” Golden Drum: A Magazine for Western Buddhists (February-April 1990): 5–7.

Payutto, Prayudh. Buddhist Economics: A Middle Way for the Marketplace. Bangkok: Buddhadhamma Foundation, 1994.

Pei, Shengji. “Managing for Biological Diversity in Temple Yards and Holy Hills: The Traditional Practices of the Xishuangbanna Dai Community, Southwestern China.” In Ethics, Religion, and Biodiversity: Relations between Conservation and Cultural Values, eds. Lawrence S. Hamilton with Helen F. Takeuchi, 112–118. Cambridge: White Horse Press, 1993.

Perl, Jacob. “Ecology of Mind.” Primary Point 7, no. 2 (summer 1990): 4–6.

Phelps, Norm. The Great Compassion: Buddhism and Animal Rights. New York: Lantern Books, 2004.

Pitt, Martin. “The Pebble and the Tide.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 102–105. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.

Pongsak, Ajahn. “In the Water There Were Fish and the Fields Were Full of Rice: Reawakening the Lost Harmony of Thailand.” In Buddhism and Ecology, eds. Martine Batchelor and Kerry Brown, 87–99. London: Cassell, 1992.

Powers, C. John. Review of Buddhism and Ecology: The Interconnection of Dharma and Deeds, eds. Mary Evelyn Tucker and Duncan Williams. Environmental Ethics 22 (2000): 207-210.

Randhawa, M. S. The Cult of Trees and Tree Worship in Buddhist and Hindu Scripture. New Delhi: All-Indian Arts and Crafts Society, 1964.

Raye, Bonnie del. “Buddhists Concerned for Animals.” In Turning the Wheel: American Women Creating the New Buddhism, ed. Sandy Boucher, 289–94. San Francisco, Calif.: Harper and Row, 1988.

Reed, Christopher. “Down to Earth.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 233–35. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.

Rissho Kosei-kai. A Buddhist View for Inclusion in the Proposed “Earth Charter” Presented to the Preparatory Committee of the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) (15 December 1991). (Information may be obtained from 2–11–1 Wada, Suginami-ku, Tokyo 166, Japan.)

Roberts, Elizabeth and Elias Amidon, eds. Earth Prayers. San Francisco, Calif.: Harper Collins, 1991.
________. “Gaian Buddhism.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 147–54. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.

Robinson, Peter. “Some Thoughts on Buddhism and the Ethics of Ecology.” Proceedings of the New Mexico-West Texas Philosophical Society 7 (1972): 71–78.

Rolston, Holmes, III. “Respect for Life: Can Zen Buddhism Help in Forming an Environmental Ethic?” Zen Buddhism Today 7 (September 1989): 11–30.

Rudloe, Anne. “Pine Forest Teachings: Bringing Joy and Compassion to the Environmental Wars.” Primary Point 7, no. 2 (summer 1990): 14–15.

Ruegg, D. Seyfort. “Ahimsa and Vegetarianism in the History of Buddhism.” In Buddhist Studies in Honour of Walpola Rahula, ed. Somaratna Balasooriya et al., 234–41. London: Gordon Fraser; Sri Lanka: Vimamsa, 1980.

Ryan, P. D. Buddhism and the Natural World: Toward a Meaningful Myth. Birmingham, England: Windhorse Publications, 1998.

Sagaramati. “Do Buddhists Eat Meat?” Golden Drum: A Magazine for Western Buddhists (August-October 1989): 6–7.

Sakya Trizin. A Buddhist View on Befriending and Defending Animals. Portland, Ore.: Orgyan Chogye Chonzo Ling, 1989.

Sandell, Klas, ed. Buddhist Perspectives on the Ecocrisis. Sri Lanka: Buddhist Publication Society, 1987.
________. “Buddhist Philosophy as Inspiration to Ecodevelopment.” In Buddhist Perspectives on the Ecocrisis, ed. Klas Sandell, 30–37. Sri Lanka: Buddhist Publication Society, 1987.

Sasaki, Joshu. “Who Pollutes the World.” In Zero: Contemporary Buddhist Life and Thought, vol. 2, 151–57. Los Angeles, Calif.: Zero Press, 1979.

Schelling, Andrew. “Jataka Mind: Cross-Species Compassion from Ancient India to Earth First! Activists.” Tricycle 1, no. 1 (fall 1991): 10–19.

Schmidt, Hanns-Peter. “Ahimsa and Rebirth.” In Inside the Texts, Beyond the Texts: New Approaches to the Study of the Vedas, ed. Michael Witzel, 207–34. Harvard Oriental Series, Opera Minora, vol. 2. Cambridge, Mass.: Department of Sanskrit and Indian Studies, Harvard University, 1997.

Schmithausen, Lambert. “The Early Buddhist Tradition and Ecological Ethics.” Journal of Buddhist Ethics 4 (1997): 1–42.
________. Buddhism and Nature: The Lecture Delivered on the Occasion of the EXPO 1990 (An Enlarged Version with Notes). Tokyo: International Institute for Buddhist Studies, 1991.
________. Plants as Sentient Beings in Earliest Buddhism: The A. L. Basham Lecture for 1989. Canberra, Australia: Faculty of Asian Studies, Australian National University, 1991.
________. The Problem of the Sentience of Plants in Earliest Buddhism. Tokyo: International Institute for Buddhist Studies, 1991.

 

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