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Bibliography

John Berthrong
Boston University

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There are few works that directly connect ecology and the study of Confucianism. However, there is a growing body of literature that provides insight into the cultural, philosophic, historic, economic, and religious elements of Confucianism that do bear upon any consideration of the modern ecological worldview. This bibliography is divided into two parts: texts specifically related to the topic of Confucianism and ecology and, general, supportive reference works (by region) for understanding the larger context of Confucianism and ecology.


Texts Specifically Related to Confucianism and Ecology

Barnhill, David Landis. Review of Confucianism and Ecology: The Interrelation of Heaven, Earth, and Humans, eds. Mary Evelyn Tucker and John Berthrong. Worldviews: Environment, Culture, Religion 4, no. 1 (2000): 94-99.

Barnhill, David, and Roger Gottlieb, eds. Deep Ecology and World Religions: New Essays on Sacred Ground. Albany, NY: SUNY, 2001.

Berger, Antony R. Dark Nature in Classic Chinese Thought. Victoria, BC: Centre for Studies in Religion and Society, University of Victoria, 1999.

Berneko, Guy. “Ecohumanism, the Spontaneities of the Earth, Ziran, and K = 2.” Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31, no. 2 (2004): 183-194.

Berthrong, John. “Confucian Views of Nature.” In Nature Across Cultures: Views of Nature and the Environment in Non-Western Cultures, ed. Helaine Selin, 373-392. The Hague and London: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2003.

Black, Alison Harley. Man and Nature in the Philosophical Thought of Wang Fu-chih. Seattle, Wash.: University of Washington Press, 1989.

Blakeley, Donald N. “Listening to the Animals: The Confucian View of Animal Welfare.” Journal of Chinese Philosophy 30, no. 2 (2003): 137-157.

Blunden, Caroline, and Mark Elvin. The Cultural Atlas of World: China. Alexandria, Va.: Stonehenge Press, 1991.

Bruun, Ole and Arne Kalland, eds. Asian Perceptions of Nature: A Critical Approach. Richmond, Surrey: Nordic Institute of Asian Studies, 1995.

Chen Lai. “On Morality From the Perspective of Ecology: The Ecological Dimension of New Confucianism.” Zhonggguo Zhexueshi (The History of Chinese Philosophy) 2 (1999): 3-9.

Chuk-ling Lai, Julian and Julia Tao. “Perception of Environmental Hazards in Hong Kong Chinese.” Risk Analysis 23, no. 4 (2003): 669-684.

Cooper, David E. and Joy A. Palmer, eds. Spirit of the Environment: Religion, Value and Environmental Concern. New York: Routledge, 1998.

Coward, Harold, ed. Visions of a New Earth: Religious Perspectives on Population, Consumption, and Ecology. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 2000.

Economy, Elizabeth C. The River Runs Black: The Environmental Challenge to China’s Future. New York: Cornell University Press, 2004.

Elvin, Mark. The Retreat of the Elephants: An Environmental History of China. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2004.

Elvin, Mark, and Liu Ts’ui-jung, eds. Sediments of Time: Environment and Society in Chinese History. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.

Fan, Ruiping. “A Reconstructionist Confucian Account of Environmentalism: Toward a Human Sagely Dominion Over Nature.” Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32, no. 1 (2005): 105-122.

Forke, Alfred. The World Conception of the Chinese. London: Arthur Probsthain, 1925.

Gale, Esson M. Discourses on Salt and Iron: A Debate on State Control of Commerce and Industry in Ancient China. Reprinted. Taipei: Ch’eng Wen Publishing Company, 1973.

Geaney, Jane. “Chinese Cosmology and Recent Studies in Confucian Ethics: A Review Essay.” Journal of Religious Ethics 28, no. 3 (2000): 451-470.

Grange, Joseph. “John Dewey and Confucius: Ecological Philosophers.” Journal of Chinese Philosophy 30, no. 3-4 (2003): 419-431.

Henderson, John B. The Development and Decline of Chinese Cosmology. New York: Columbia University Press, 1984.

Huang, Yong. “Cheng Brothers’ Neo-Confucian Virtue Ethics: The Identity of Virtue and Nature.” Journal of Chinese Philosophy 30, no. 3-4 (2003): 451-467.

Inada, Kenneth K. “The Cosmological Basis of Chinese Ethical Discourse.” Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32, no. 1 (2005): 35-46.

Jenkins, T. N. “Chinese Traditional Thought and Practice: Lessons for an Ecological Economics Worldview.” Ecological Economics 40, no. 1 (2002): 39-52.

Jiang, Xinyan. “Why Was Mengzi Not a Vegetarianist?” Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32, no. 1 (2005): 59-73.

Jones, David. Review of Confucianism and Ecology: The Interrelation of Heaven, Earth, and Humans, eds. Mary Evelyn Tucker and John Berthrong. Journal of Asian & African Studies 15, no. 3 (2000): 358-359.

Louden, Robert B. “‘What Does Heaven Say?’: Christian Wolff and Western Interpretations of Confucian Ethics.” In Confucius and the Analects: New Essays, ed. Bryan W. Van Norden, 73-93. New York: Oxford University Press, 2002.

Miller, James and He Xiang. “Confucian Spirituality in an Ecological Age.” In Chinese Religions in Contemporary Societies, ed. James Miller, 281-300. Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO Press, 2006.

Needham, Joseph. Science and Civilisation in China. 8 vols. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1954—.

Powers, C. John. Review of Confucianism and Ecology: The Interrelation of Heaven, Earth, and Humans, eds. Mary Evelyn Tucker and John Berthrong. Environmental Ethics 22, (2000):207-210.

Selin, Helaine, ed. Nature Across Cultures: Views of Nature and the Environment in Non-Western Cultures. The Hague and London: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2003.

Shapiro, Judith. Mao’s War Against Nature: Politics and the Environment in Revolutionary China. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001.

Snyder, Samuel. “Chinese Traditions and Ecology: A Survey Article.” Worldviews: Environment, Culture, Religion 10, no. 1 (2006): 100-34.

Tao, Julia. “Confucian Environmental Ethics: Relational Resonance with Nature.” Social Alternatives 23 no. 4 (2004): 5-9.

Taylor, Rodney L. The Confucian Way of Contemplation: Okada Takehiko and the Tradition of Quiet-Sitting. Columbia, S.C.: University of South Carolina Press, 1988.
________. “Of Animals and Man: The Confucian Perspective.” In Animal Sacrifices: Religious Perspectives on the Use of Animals in Science, ed. Tom Regan, 237-263. Philadelphia: Temple Press, 1986.

Totman, Conrad. Early Modern Japan. Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 1993.

Tu Wei-ming. “The Ecological Turn in New Confucian Humanism: Implications for China and the World.” Daedalus 130, no. 4 (2001): 243-264.

Tucker, Mary Evelyn. Worldly Wonder: Religions Enter Their Ecological Phase. Chicago, IL: Open Court, 2003.
________. “Confucian Ethics and the Ecocrisis.” In When Worlds Converge: What Science and Religion Tell Us About the Story of the Universe and Our Place in It, eds. Clifford N. Matthews, Mary Evelyn Tucker, and Philip Hefner, 310-323. Peru, IL: Carus Publishing Company, 2002.
________. “The Relevance of Chinese Neo-Confucianism for the Reverence of Nature.” Environmental History Review 15, no. 2 (1991): 55-67.

Tucker, Mary Evelyn, and John Berthrong, eds. Confucianism and Ecology: The Interrelation of Heaven, Earth, and Humans. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Divinity School, Center for the Study of World Religions, 1998. Distributed by Harvard University Press.

Tucker, Mary Evelyn, and John A. Grim. Worldviews and Ecology: Religion, Philosophy, and the Environment. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1994.

Valder, Peter. Gardens In China. Portland, OR: Timber Press, 2002.

Yamauchi, T. “Wang Yang-Ming.” In Fifty Key Thinkers on the Environment, ed. Joy A. Palmer, 27-33. New York, NY: Routledge, 2001.

Yu, Kam-por. “Respecting Nature and Using Human Intelligence: Elements of a Confucian Bioethics.” In Genomics in Asia: A Clash of Bioethical Interests?, ed. Margaret Sleeboom, 159-177. London: Kegan Paul, 2004.

Wang, Aihe. Cosmology and Political Culture in Early China. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.

Weber, Ralph. “Oneness and Particularity in Chinese Natural Cosmology: the Notion of Tianrenheyi.” Asian Philosophy 15, no. 2 (2005): 191-205.

Zhang Yunfei. “On Confucianism and Taoism from the Perspective of Eco-ethics.” In The Progress of Environmental Ethics: Critics and Interpretation, ed. Xu Songling. Beijing: Social Science Literature Press, 1999.

 


General Reference Works

Chan, Wing-tsit. Chinese Philosophy, 1949–1963: An Annotated Bibliography of Mainland China Publications. Honolulu, Hawaii: East-West Center Press, University of Hawaii, 1967.
_______. A Source Book in Chinese Philosophy. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1963.

Ching, Julia. Chinese Religions. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1993.

Dawson, Raymond, ed. The Legacy of China. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1964.

de Bary, Wm. Theodore, and Irene Bloom, eds. Sources of Chinese Tradition. 2 vols. New York: Columbia University Press, 1999.

Elvin, Mark. The Pattern of the Chinese Past. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1973.

Fairbank, John King. China: A New History. Cambridge, Mass.: The Belknap Press of Harvard University, 1992.

Fairbank, John King and Denis Twitchett, eds. The Cambridge History of China. 15 vols. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986–.

Fung, Yu-lan. A Short History of Chinese Philosophy. Edited by Derk Bodde. New York: The Macmillan Company, 1964.
_______. A History of Chinese Philosophy. 2 vols. Translated by Derk Bodde. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1952–1953.
_______. The Spirit of Chinese Philosophy. Translated by E. R. Hughes. Boston: Beacon Press, 1947.

Gernet, Jacques. A History of Chinese Civilization. Translated by J. R. Foster. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1982.

Jochim, Christian. Chinese Religions: A Cultural Perspective. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prenctice-Hall, Inc., 1986.

Keightley, David N., ed. The Origins of Chinese Civilization. Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 1983.

Lach, Donald F. Asia in the Making of Europe. Chicago, Ill.: University of Chicago Press, 1965–1993.

Lee, Ki-baik. A New History of Korea. Tanslated by Edward W. Wagner and Edward J. Schultz. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1984.

Lee, Peter H. Sourcebook of Korean Civilization. 2 vols. New York: Columbia University Press, 1993–1996.

Liu, Shu-hsien, and Robert E. Allinson, eds. Harmony and Strife: Contemporary Perspectives, East and West. Hong Kong: The Chinese University Press, 1988.

Lopez, Donald S., Jr. Religions of China in Practice. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1996.

Martinson, Paul Varo. A Theology of World Religions: Interpreting God, Self, and World in Semitic, Indian, and Chinese Thought. Minneapolis, Minn.: Augsburg, 1987.

Maspero, Henri. China in Antiquity. Translated by Frank A. Kierman, Jr. Amherst, Mass.: University of Massachusetts Press, 1978.

Moore, Charles A. The Chinese Mind: Essentials of Chinese Philosophy and Culture. Honolulu, Hawaii: University of Hawaii Press, 1967.

Mote, Frederick W. Intellectual Foundations of China. 2d ed. New York: McGraw-Hill Publishing Company, 1989.

Naess, Arne, and Alastir Hanny, eds. Invitation to Chinese Philosophy. Oslo: Scandinavian University Books, 1972.

Nakamura, Hajime. Parallel Developments: A Comparative History of Ideas. Tokyo: Kodansha, 1975.
_______. Ways of Thinking of Eastern Peoples: India, China, Tibet, and Japan. Honolulu, Hawaii: East-West Center Press, 1964.

Overmeyer, Daniel L. Religions of China: The World as Living System. San Francisco, Calif.: Harper and Row, 1986.

Paper, Jordan. The Spirits are Drunk: Comparative Approaches to Chinese Religion. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1995.

Reid, T. R. Confucius Lives Next Door: What Living in the East Teaches Us about Living in the West. New York: Random House, 1999.

Sansom, George. Japan, A Short Cultural History. Rev. ed. New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1962.

Schirokauer, Conrad. A Brief History of Japanese Civilization. 2d ed. Forth Worth, Tex.: Harcourt Brace Publishers, 1993.
_______. A Brief History of Chinese Civilization. 2d ed. Forth Worth, Tex.: Harcourt Brace Publishers, 1991.

Sommer, Deborah, ed. Chinese Religion: An Anthology of Sources. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995.

Thompson, Laurence. Chinese Religion. 4th ed. Belmont, Calif.: Wadsworth Publishing, 1989.

Tsunoda, Ryusaku, ed. Sources of the Japanese Tradition. New York: Columbia University Press, 1958.

Tu Wei-ming, ed. Confucian Traditions in East Asian Modernity: Moral Education and Economic Culture in Japan and the Four Mini-Dragons. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1996.

Tuan, Yi Fu. Segmented Worlds and Self: Group Life and Individual Consciousness. Minneapolis, Minn.: University of Minnesota Press, 1982.

Weller, Robert P. Unities and Diversities in Chinese Religion. Seattle, Wash.: University of Washington Press, 1987.

Yang, C. K. Religion in Chinese Society. Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 1967.

Yates, Robin D. Five Lost Classics: Tao, Huang-Lao, and Yin-Yang in Han China. New York: Ballantine Books, 1997.

Yu, David C. Religion in Postwar China: A Critical Analysis and Annotated Bibliography. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1994.


Monographs: China

Allan, Sarah. The Shape of the Turtle: Myth, Art, and Cosmos in Early China. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1991.

Allinson, Robert E., ed. Understanding the Chinese Mind: The Philosophic Roots. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1989.

Balazs, Etienne. Chinese Civilization and Bureaucracy: Variations on a Theme. Translated by H. M. Wright and edited by Arthur F. Wright. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1964.

Barrett, Timothy Hugh. Li Ao: Buddhist, Taoist, or Neo-Confucian? Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992.

Bauer, Wolfgang. China and the Search for Happiness: Recurring Themes in Four Thousand Years of Chinese Cultural History. Translated by Michael Shaw. New York: The Seabury Press, 1976.

Berling, Judith A. The Syncretic Religion of Lin Chao-en. New York: Columbia University Press, 1980.

Berthrong, John H. Transformations of the Confucian Way. Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1998.
_______. Concerning Creativity: A Comparison of Chu Hsi, Whitehead, and Neville. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1998.
_______. All Under Heaven: Transforming Paradigms in Confucian-Christian Dialogue. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1994.

Birdwhistell, Anne D. Li Yong (1627–1705) and Epistemological Dimensions of Confucian Philosophy. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1996.
_______. Transition to Neo-Confucianism: Shao Yung on Knowledge and Symbols of Reality. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1989.

Bloom, Irene. Knowledge Painfully Acquired: The K’un-chih chi by Lo Ch’in-shun. New York: Columbia University Press, 1987.

Bloom, Irene, and Joshua A. Fogel, eds. Meetings of Minds: Intellectual and Religious Interaction in East Asian Traditions of Thought. New York: Columbia University Press, 1996.

Bodde, Derk. Chinese Thought, Society, and Science: The Intellectual and Social Background of Science and Technology in Pre-modern China. Honolulu, Hawaii: University of Hawaii Press, 1991.
_______. Essays on Chinese Civilization. Edited by Charles Le Blanc and Dorthy Borei. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1981.

Bol, Peter K. “This Culture of Ours”: Intellectual Transition in T’ang and Sung China. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1992.

Chang, Carsun. The Development of Neo-Confucian Thought. 2 vols. New York: Bookman Associates, 1957–1962.

Chang, Kwang-chih. Art, Myth and Ritual: The Path to Political Authority in Ancient China. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1983.

Chen, Charles K. H., comp. Neo-Confucianism, Etc.: Essays by Wing-tsit Chan. Hanover, N.H.: Oriental Society, 1969.

Cheng, Chung-ying. New Dimensions of Confucian and Neo-Confucian Philosophy. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1991.
_______., trans. Tai Chin’s Inquiry into Goodness. Honolulu, Hawaii: East-West Center Press, 1971.

Ch’ien, Edward T. Chiao Hung and the Restructuring of Neo-Confucianism in the Late Ming. New York: Columbia University Press, 1986.

Chin, Ann-ping, and Mansfield Freeman. Tai Chen on Mencius: Explorations in Words and Meaning. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1990.

Ching, Julia. Probing China’s Soul: Religion, Politics, and Protest in the People’s Republic. San Francisco, Calif.: Harper and Row, Publishers, 1990.
_______. Confucianism and Christianity: A Comparative Study. Tokyo: Kodansha International, 1977.
_______. To Acquire Wisdom: The Way of Wang Yang-ming. New York: Columbia University Press, 1976.
_______., trans. The Philosophical Letters of Wang Yang-ming. Columbia, S.C.: University of South Carolina Press, 1972.

Ching, Julia and Hans Küng. Christianity and Chinese Religion. New York: Doubleday, 1989.

Ching, Julia, and R. W. L. Guisso, eds. Sages and Filial Sons: Mythology and Archaeology in Ancient China. Hong Kong: Chinese University of Hong Press, 1991.

Chow, Kai-wing. The Rise of Confucian Ritualism in Late Imperial China: Ethics, Classics, and Lineage Discourse. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1995.

Chu Hsi. Chu Hsi’s Family Rituals: A Twelfth-Century Chinese Manual for the Performance of Cappings, Weddings, Funerals, and Ancestral Rites. Translated and edited by Patricia Buckley Ebrey. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1991.
_______. The Philosophy of Human Nature. Translated by J. Percy Bruce. London: Probsthain and Co., 1922; New York: AMS Press Edition, 1973.

Chu Hsi and Lü Tsu-ch’ien. Reflections on Things at Hand: The Neo-Confucian Anthology. Translated by Wing-tsit Chan. New York: Columbia University Press, 1967.

Confucius. Confucius: The Analects (Lun yü). Translated by D. C. Lau. Hong Kong: The Chinese University Press, 1992.

Cua, Antonio S. Ethical Argumentation: A Study in Hsün Tzu’s Moral Epistemology. Honolulu, Hawaii: University Press of Hawaii, 1985.
_______. The Unity of Knowledge and Action: A Study of Wang Yang-ming’s Moral Psychology. Honolulu, Hawaii: University Press of Hawaii, 1982.
_______. Dimensions of Moral Creativity: Paradigms, Principles, and Ideals. University Park, Pa.: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1978.

de Bary, Wm. Theodore. The Trouble with Confucianism. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1991.
_______. East Asian Civilizations: A Dialogue in Five Stages. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1988.
_______. The Liberal Tradition in China. New York: Columbia University Press, 1983.

de Bary, Wm. Theodore and Irene Bloom, eds. Principle and Practicality: Essay in Neo-Confucianism and Practical Learning. New York: Columbia University Press, 1979.

de Bary, Wm. Theodore and John W. Chaffee, eds. Neo-Confucian Education: The Formative Stage. Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 1989.

Eber, Irene, ed. Confucianism: The Dynamics of Tradition. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company, 1986.

Ebery, Patricia Buckley. The Inner Quarters: Marriage and the Lives of Chinese Women in the Sung Period. Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 1993.
_______. Confucianism and Family Rituals in Imperial China: A Social History of Writing about Rites. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1991.

Elman, Benjamin A. From Philosophy to Philology: Intellectual and Social Aspects of Change in Late Imperial China. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1984.

Elvin, Mark. Another History: Essays on China from a European Perspective. Sydney: Wild Peony, 1996.

Eno, Robert. The Confucian Creation of Heaven: Philosophy and the Defense of Ritual Mastery. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1990.

Fingarette, Herbert. Confucius—the Secular as Sacred. New York: Harper and Row, Publishers, 1972.

Gardner, Daniel K., trans. Learning to Be a Sage: Selections from the Conversations of Master Chu, Arranged Topically. Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 1990.
_______. Chu Hsi and the Ta-hsüeh: Neo-Confucian Reflection the Confucian Canon. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1986.

Gilmartin, Christina K., et al., eds. Engendering China: Women, Culture, and the State. Harvard Contemporary China Series, no. 10. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1994.

Graham, Angus Charles. Disputers of the Tao: Philosophical Argument in Ancient China. La Salle, Ill.: Open Court, 1989.

Hall, David and Roger T. Ames. Thinking from the Han: Self, Truth, and Transcendence in Chinese and Western Culture. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1998.
_______., Anticipating China: Thinking Through the Narratives of Chinese and Western Culture. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1995.
_______., Thinking Through Confucius. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1987.

Hansen, Chad. A Daoist Theory of Chinese Thought: A Philosophic Interpretation. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992.

Ho, Peng Yoke. Li, Qi, and Shu: An Introduction to Science and Civilization in China. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 1985.

Ho, Ping-ti. The Cradle of the East: An Inquiry into the Indigenous Origins of Techniques and Ideas of Neolithic and Early Historic China, 5000–1000 B. C. Hong Kong: The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 1975.

Hoobler, Thomas, and Dorthy Hoobler. Confucianism: World Religions. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 1993.

Hsiao, Kung-chuan. From the Beginnings to the Sixth Century A.D. vol. 1. A History of Chinese Political Thought. Translated by F. W. Mote. Princeton Library of Asian Traditions. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1979.

Huang Tsung-hsi. The Records of Ming Scholars. Edited by Julia Ching with the collaboration of Chaoying Fang. Honolulu, Hawaii: University of Hawaii Press, 1987.

Ivanhoe, Philip J., ed. Chinese Language, Thought, and Culture: Nivison and His Critics. Chicago, Ill.: Open Court, 1996.
_______. Confucian Moral Self Cultivation. New York: Peter Lang, 1993.

Jensen, Lionel M. Manufacturing Confucianism: Chinese Traditions and Universal Civilization. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 1997.

Kasoff, Ira E. The Thought of Chang Tsai. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1984.

Knoblock, John. Xunzi: A Translation and Study of the Complete Works. 3 vols. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1988–1994.

Ko, Dorthy. Teachers of the Inner Chambers: Women and Culture in Seventeenth-Century China. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1994.

Kuriyama, Shigehisa. The Expressiveness of the Body and the Divergence of Greek and Chinese Medicine. New York: Zone Books, 1999.

Lee, Peter K. H., ed. Confucian-Christian Encounter in Historical and Contemporary Perspective. Lewiston, N.Y.: The Edwin Mellen Press, 1991.

Legge, James, trans. The Chinese Classics. 5 vols. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 1960.

Levenson, Joseph R. Confucian China and Its Modern Faith: A Trilogy. 3 vols. Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 1968.

Lewis, Mark Edward. Writing and Authority in Early China. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1999.

Liu, Shu-hsien. Understanding Confucian Philosophy: Classical and Sung-Ming. Westport, Conn.: Praeger Publishers, 1998.

Lynn, Richard John., trans. The Classic of Changes: A New Translation of the I Ching as Interpreted by Wang Bi. New York: Columbia University Press, 1994.

Machle, Edward J. Nature and Heaven in the Xunzi: A Study of Tien Lun. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1993.

Mann, Susan. Precious Records: Women in China’s Long Eighteenth Century. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1997.

Maspero, Henri. China in Antiquity. Translated by Frank A. Kierman, Jr. Amherst, Mass.: University of Massachusetts Press, 1978.

Mencius. Mencius. Translated by D. C. Lau. 2 vols. Hong Kong: The Chinese University Press, 1984.

Metzger, Thomas A. Escape from Predicament: Neo-Confucianism and China’s Evolving Political Culture. New York: Columbia University Press, 1977.

Munro, Donald J. Images of Human Nature: A Sung Portrait. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1988.
_______. The Concept of Man in Contemporary China. Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan Press, 1977.
_______. The Concept of Man in Early China. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1969.

Neville, Robert C. The Tao and the Daimon: Segments of a Religious Inquiry. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1982.

Nivison, David S. The Ways of Confucianism: Investigations in Chinese Philosophy. Edited by Bryan W. Van Norden. Chicago, Ill.: Open Court, 1996.
_______. The Life and Thought of Chang Hsüeh-ch’eng (1738–1801). Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1966.

Peterson, Willard J. Bitter Gourd: Fan I-chih and the Impetus for Intellectual Change. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1979.

Prazniak, Roxann. Dialogues Across Civilizations: Sketches in World History from the Chinese and European Experiences. Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1996.

Queen, Sarah A. From Chronicle to Canon: The Hermeneutics of the Spring and Autumn, According to Tung Chung-shu. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996.

Raphals, Lisa. Knowing Words: Wisdom and Cunning in the Classical Traditions of China and Greece. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1992.

Roetz, Heiner. Confucian Ethics of the Axial Age: A Reconstruction under the Aspect of the Breakthrough Toward Postconventional Thinking. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1993.

Ropp, Paul S., ed. Heritage of China: Contemporary Perspectives on Chinese Civilization. Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 1990.

Rosemont, Henry, Jr. A Chinese Mirror: Moral Reflections on Political Economy and Society. La Salle, Ill.: Open Court, 1991.
_______, ed. Chinese Texts and Philosophical Contexts: Essays Dedicated to Angus C. Graham. La Salle, Ill.: Open Court, 1991.
_______, ed. Explorations in Early Chinese Cosmology. Chico, Calif.: Scholars Press, 1984.

Rozman, Gilbert, ed. The East Asian Region: Confucian Heritage and Its Modern Adaptation. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1991.

Saussy, Haun. The Problem of a Chinese Aesthetic. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1993.

Schwartz, Benjamin I. The World of Thought in Ancient China. Cambridge, Mass.: The Belknap Press of Harvard University, 1985.

Shao Yung. Dialogue Between a Fisherman and a Wood-Cutter. Translated by Knud Lundbaek. Hamburg: C. Bell Verlag, 1986.

Shaughnessy, Edward L. Before Confucius: Studies in the Creation of the Chinese Classics. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1997.
_______. I Ching: The Classic of Changes. New York: Ballantine Books, 1996.

Shun, Kwong-loi. Mencius and Early Chinese Thought. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1997.

Smith, D. Howard. Chinese Religions. New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1968.

Smith, Richard J. China’s Cultural Heritage: The Ch’ing Dynasty, 1644–1912. 2d ed. Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1994.
_______. Fortune-Tellers and Philosophers: Divination in Traditional Chinese Society. Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1991.

Smith, Richard J. and D. W. Y. Kwok, eds. Cosmology, Ontology, and Human Efficacy. Honolulu, Hawaii: University of Hawaii Press, 1993.

Som, Tjan Tjoe. The Comprehensive Discussions in the White Tiger Hall. 2 vols. Westport, Conn.: Hyperion Press, 1973; Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1949.

Strassberg, Richard E. Inscribed Landscapes: Travel Writing from Imperial China. Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 1994.
_______. The World of K’ung Shang-jen: A Man of Letters in Early Ch’ing China. New York: Columbia University Press, 1983.

Taylor, Rodney L. The Religious Dimensions of Confucianism. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1990.
_______. The Cultivation of Sagehood as a Religious Goal in Neo-Confucianism: A Study of Selected Writings of Kao P’an-lung, 1562–1626. Missoula, Mont.: Scholars Press, 1978.

Tillman, Hoyt Cleveland. Ch’en Liang on Public Interest and the Law. Honolulu, Hawaii: University of Hawaii Press, 1994.
_______. Confucian Discourse and Chu Hsi’s Ascendancy. Honolulu, Hawaii: University of Hawaii Press, 1992.
_______. Utilitarian Confucianism: Ch’en Liang’s Challenge to Chu Hsi. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1982.

Tu, Wei-ming. Way, Learning, and Politics: Essays on the Confucian Intellectual. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1993.
_______. Centrality and Commonality: An Essay on Confucian Religiousness. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1989.
_______. Confucian Thought: Self-hood as Creative Transformation. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1985.
_______. Humanity and Self-Cultivation: Essays in Confucian Thought. Berkeley, Calif.: Asian Humanities Press, 1979.
_______. Neo-Confucian Thought in Action: Wang Yang-ming’s Youth (1472–1509). Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 1976.

Tu, Wei-ming, ed. China in Transformation. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1994.

Tu, Wei-ming, Milan Hejtmanek, and Alan Wachman, eds. The Confucian World Observed: A Contemporary Discussion of Confucian Humanism in East Asia. Honolulu, Hawaii: University of Hawaii Press, 1992.

Van Zoeren, Steven. Poetry and Personality: Reading, Exegesis, and Hermeneutics in Traditional China. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1991.

Wang Yang-ming. Instructions for Practical Living and Other Neo-Confucian Writings. Translated by Wing Tsit-chan. New York: Columbia University Press, 1963.

Watson, Burton, trans. Basic Writings of Mo Tzu, Hsün Tzu, and Han Fei Tzu. New York: Columbia University Press, 1967.

Weber, Max. The Religion of China: Confucianism and Taoism. Translated by Hans H. Gerth. New York: Macmillan, 1951.

Wilson, Thomas A. Genealogy of the Way: The Construction and Uses of the Confucian Tradition in Late Imperial China. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1995.

Wittenborn, Allen, trans. Further Reflections on Things at Hand: A Reader, Chu Hsi. Lanham, Md.: University Press of America, 1991.

Wyatt, Don J. The Recluse of Loyang: Shao Yung and the Moral Evolution of Early Sung Thought. Honolulu, Hawaii: University of Hawaii Press, 1996.

Yang Hsiung. The Elemental Changes: The Ancient Chinese Companion to the I Ching, The T’ai Hsüan Ching of Master Yang Hsiung. Translated and edited by Michael Nylan. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1994.
_______. The Canon of Supreme Mystery: A Translation with Commentary of the T’ai Hsüan Ching. Translated and edited by Michael Nylan. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1993.

Zaehner, Robert Charles. Concordant Discord: The Interdependence of Faiths. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1970.


Monographs: Japan

Bellah, Robert N. Tokugawa Religion: The Values of Pre-Industrial Japan. Boston: Beacon Press, 1957.

Craig, Albert, and Donald Shively, eds. Personality in Japanese History. Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 1970.

Davis, Winston. Japanese Religion and Society: Paradigms of Structure and Change. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1992.

Dore, Ronald P. Taking Japan Seriously: A Confucian Perspective on Economic Issues. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1987.
_______. Education in Tokugawa Japan. Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 1965.

Elison, George. Deus Destroyed: The Image of Christianity in Early Modern Japan. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1973.

Gluck, Carol. Japan’s Modern Myths: Ideology in the Late Meiji Period. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1985.

Irokawa, Daikichi. The Culture of the Meiji Period. Translated and edited by Marius B. Jansen. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1985.

Jansen, Marius B. China in the Tokugawa World. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1992.

Kassel, Marleen. Tokugawa Confucian Education: The Kangien Academy of Hirose Tanso (1782–1856). Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1996.

Kitagawa, Joseph M. On Understanding Japanese Religion. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1987.

Lidin, Olof. The Life of Ogyu Sorai: A Tokugawa Confucian Philosopher. Lund: Scandinavian Institute of Asian Studies, 1973.
_______., trans. Ogyu Sorai’s Distinguishing the Way. Tokyo: Sophia University Press, 1970.

Maruyama, Masao. Studies in the Intellectual History of Tokugawa Japan. Translated by Mikiso Hane. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1974.

McEwan, J. R., trans. The Political Writings of Ogyu Sorai. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1969.

Mercer, Rosemary, trans. Deep Words: Miura Baien’s System of Natural Philosophy. Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1991.

Najita, Tetsuo. Visions of Virtue in Tokugawa Japan: The Kaitokudo Merchant Academy of Osaka. Chicago, Ill.: University of Chicago Press, 1987.

Najita, Tetsuo and Irwin Scheiner, eds. Japanese Thought in the Tokugawa Period 1600–1868: Methods and Metaphors. Chicago, Ill.: University of Chicago Press, 1978.

Nakamura, Hajime. A History of the Development of Japanese Thought from A. D. 592 to 1868. Tokyo: Japan Cultural Society, 1969.

Nosco, Peter, ed. Confucianism and Tokugawa Culture. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1984.

Odin, Steve. The Social Self in Zen and American Pragmatism. Albany, N.Y.: The State University of New York Press, 1996.

Ooms, Herman. Tokugawa Ideology: Early Constructs, 1570–1680. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1985.

Sansom, George. A History of Japan. 3 vols. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1958–1963.

Sawada, Janine Anderson. Confucian Values and Popular Zen: Sekimon Shingaku in Eighteenth-Century Japan. Honolulu, Hawaii: University of Hawaii Press, 1993.

Smith, Warren W. Confucianism in Modern Japan: A Study of Conservatism in Japanese Intellectual History. 2d ed. Tokyo: Hokuseido Press, 1973.

Spae, Joseph. Ito Jinsai: A Philosopher, Educator, and Sinologist of the Tokugawa Period. New York: Paragon, 1967.

Tucker, Mary Evelyn. Moral and Spiritual Cultivation in Japanese Neo-Confucianism: The Life and Thought of Kaibara Ekken (1630–1714). Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1989.

Yamashita, Samuel H. Master Sorai’s Responsals: Annotated Translation of Sorai Sensi Tomonsho. Honolulu, Hawaii: University of Hawaii Press, 1994.


Monographs: Korea
Choi, Ming-hong. A Modern History of Korean Philosophy. Seoul: Seong Moon Sa, 1980.

Choung Haechang, and Han Hyong-jo, eds. Confucian Philosophy in Korea. Kyonggi-do: The Academy of Korean Studies, 1996.

Chung, Edward Y. J. The Korean Neo-Confucianism of Yi T’oegye and Yi Yulgok: A Reappraisal of the “Four-Seven Thesis” and Its Practical Implications for Self-Cultivation. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1995.

de Bary, Wm. Theodore and JaHyun Kim Haboush, eds. The Rise of Neo-Confucianism in Korea. New York: Columbia University Press, 1985.

Deuchler, Martina. The Confucian Transformation of Korea: A Study of Society and Ideology. New York: Columbia University Press, 1992.

Grayson, James Huntley. Korea: A Religious History. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1989.

Kalton, Michael, et al. The Four Seven Debate: An Annotated Translation of the Most Famous Controversy in Korean Neo-Confucian Thought. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1994.

Kalton, Michael C., trans. To Become a Sage: The Ten Diagrams on Sage Learning by Yi T’oegye. New York: Columbia University Press, 1988.

Kang, Hugh H. W., ed. The Traditional Culture and Society of Korea: Thought and Institutions. Honolulu, Hawaii: Center for Korean Studies, University of Hawaii Press, 1975.

Kendall, Laurel, and Griffin Dix, eds. Ritual and Religion in Korean Society. Berkeley, Calif.: Institute of East Asian Studies, University of California, Berkeley Center For Korean Studies, 1987.

Kim, Sung-Hae. The Righteous and the Sage: A Comparative Study on the Ideal Images of Man in Biblical Israel and Classical China. Seoul: Sogang University Press, 1985.

Palais, James B. Confucian Statescraft and Korean Institutions: Yu Hyongwon and the Late Chosen Dynasty. Seattle, Wash.: University of Washington Press, 1996.

Peterson, Mark A. Korean Adoption and Inheritance: Case Studies in the Creation of a Classic Confucian Society. Ithaca, N.Y.: East Asian Studies Program, 1996.

Phillips, Earl H., and Eui-young Yu, eds. Religions in Korea: Beliefs and Cultural Values. Los Angeles, Calif.: Center for Korean-American and Korean Studies, California State University, 1982.

Ro, Young-chan. The Korean Neo-Confucianism of Yi Yulgok. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1989.

Setton, Mark. Chong Yagyong: Korea’s Challenge to Orthodox Neo-Confucianism. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1997.

 

Copyright © 1998 John Berthrong.
Reprinted with permission.