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Bibliography

James Miller
Queen’s University

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Allan, Sarah. The Way of Water and Sprouts of Virtue. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1997.

Ames, Roger T. “Putting the Te back into Taoism.” In Nature in Asian Traditions of Thought, eds. J. Baird Callicott and Roger T. Ames, 113–44. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1989.
_______. “Taoism and the Nature of Nature.” Environmental Ethics 8, no. 4 (winter 1986): 317–50.

Ames, Roger T., ed. Wandering at Ease in the Zhuangzi. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1989

Anderson, Eugene N. Ecologies of the Heart: Emotion, Belief, and the Environment. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996.
________. The Food of China. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1988.

Anderson, Eugene N., and Marja Anderson. Mountains and Water: Essays on the Cultural Ecology of South Coastal China. Taipei: Orient Cultural Service, 1973.

Barnhart, Michael, ed. Varieties of Ethical Reflection: New Directions for Ethics in a Global Context. Studies in Comparative Philosophy and Religion, no. 1. Lanham, Md.: Lexington Books, 2002.

Barnhill, David, and Roger Gottlieb, eds. Deep Ecology and World Religions: New Essays on Sacred Ground. Albany, NY: SUNY, 2001.

Bennet, David. Ecological Sustainability, Deep Environmental Ethics, and Tao: A Preliminary Conjunction. Fundamental Questions Paper No. 4. Adelaide, Australia: Centre for Resource and Environmental Studies, 1990.

Berger, Antony R. Dark Nature in Classic Chinese Thought. Victoria, BC: Center for Studies in Religion and Society, University of Victoria, 1999.

Bruun, Ole and Arne Kalland, eds. Asian Perceptions of Nature: A Critical Approach. Richmond, Surrey: Nordic Institute of Asian Studies, 1995.

Callicott, J. Baird. Earth’s Insights: A Survey of Ecological Ethics from the Mediterranean Basin to the Australian Outback. Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 1994.

Callicott, J. Baird and Roger Ames, eds. Nature in Asian Traditions of Thought: Essays in Environmental Philosophy. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1989.

Chen Congzhou. On Chinese Gardens. Shanghai: Tongji University Press, 1984.

Chen, Ellen Marie. “The Meaning of Te in the Tao Te Ching: An Examination of the Concept of Nature in Chinese Taoism.” Philosophy East and West 23, no. 4 (October 1973): 457–70.

Cheng Chung-ying. “Approaches to Environment Ethics Reconsidered.” Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32, no. 2 (2005): 343-348.
________. “On the Environmental Ethics of the Tao and the Ch’i.” Environmental Ethics 8, no. 4 (winter 1986): 351–70.

Clarke, John James. The Tao of the West: Western Transformations of Taoist Thought. London and New York, NY: Routledge, 2000.
________. Oriental Enlightenment: The Encounter Between Asian and Western Thought.
London: Routledge, 1997.

Cooper, David. E. “Chuang Tzu.” In Fifty Key Thinkers on the Environment, ed. Joy A. Palmer, 7-12. New York, NY: Routledge, 2001.
________.“Is Daoism ‘Green’?” Asian Philosophy 4, no. 2 (1994): 119-125.

Cooper, David E. and Joy A. Palmer, eds. Spirit of the Environment: Religion, Value and Environmental Concern. New York: Routledge, 1998.

Coward, Harold, ed. Visions of a New Earth: Religious Perspectives on Population, Consumption, and Ecology. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 2000.

Curtin, Deane. Review of Daoism and Ecology: Ways within a Cosmic Landscape. Environmental Ethics 26, no. 1 (2004):105-106.

Dunstan, Helen. “Official Thinking on Environmental Issues and the State’s Environmental Roles in Eighteenth-Century China.” In Sediments of Time: Environment and Society in Chinese History, eds. Mark Elvin and Liu Ts’ui-jung, 585–614. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.

Eliade, Mircea. The Forge and the Crucible: The Origins and Structures of Alchemy. 2d ed. Translated by Stephen Corrin. Chicago, Ill.: University of Chicago Press, 1978. Originally published as Forgerons et alchimistes (Paris: Flammarion, 1965).

Elvin, Mark. The Retreat of the Elephants: An Environmental History of China. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2004.

Elvin, Mark, and Liu Ts’ui-jung, eds. Sediments of Time: Environment and Society in Chinese History. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.

Finnane, Antonia. “Water, Love and Labor: Aspects of a Gendered Environment.” In Sediments of Time: Environment and Society in Chinese History, eds. Mark Elvin and Liu Ts’ui-jung, 657–90. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.

Foltz, Richard. Worldviews, Religion, and the Environment. Belmont, CA: Thomson/Wadsworth, 2003.

Fox, Alan. “Process Ecology and the ‘Ideal’ Dao.” Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32, no. 1 (2005): 47-57.

Fox, Warwick. “Deep Ecology: A New Philosophy for Our Time?” The Ecologist 14, nos. 5–6 (1984): 194–200.

Girardot, Norman J. Myth and Meaning in Early Taoism: The Theme of Chaos (Hun-tun). Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 1983.
_______. “Taoism.” In Encylopedia of Bioethics, vol. 4, ed. Norman J. Giradot, 1631-38. New York: Macmillan, 1978.

Girardot, Norman J., James Miller, and Liu Xiaogan, eds. Daoism and Ecology: Ways Within A Cosmic Landscape. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Divinity School, Center for the Study of World Religions, 2001. Distributed by Harvard University Press.

Goldin, Paul R. “Why Daoism is Not Environmentalism.” Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32, no. 1 (2005): 75-88.

Goodman, Russell. “Taoism and Ecology.” Environmental Ethics 2, no. 1 (1980): 73-80.

Gottlieb, Roger S., ed. This Sacred Earth: Religion, Nature, Environment. New York: Routledge, 1996.

Hall, David L. “On Seeking a Change of Environment.” In Nature in Asian Traditions of Thought: Essays in Environmental Philosophy, eds. J. Baird Callicott and Roger T. Ames, 99–112. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1989.

Ho, Ping-Ti. The Cradle of the East: An Inquiry into the Indigenous Origins of Techniques and Ideas of Neolithic and Early Historic China, 5000–1000 B.C. Hong Kong: Chinese University of Hong Kong Press; Chicago, Ill.: University of Chicago Press, 1975.

Houten, Richard Van. “Nature and Tzu-Jan in Early Chinese Philosophical Literature.” Journal of Chinese Philosophy 15, no. 1 (1988): 33–49.

Inada, Kenneth K. “The Cosmological Basis of Chinese Ethical Discourse.” Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32, no. 1 (2005): 35-46.

Ip Po-keung. “Taoism and the Foundation of Environmental Ethics.” Environmental Ethics 5, no. 4 (winter 1983): 335–43.

Jenkins, T. N. “Chinese Traditional Thought and Practice: Lessons for an Ecological Economics Worldview.” Ecological Economics 40, no. 1 (2002): 39-52.

Johnston, R. Stewart. Scholar Gardens of China: A Study and Analysis of the Spatial Design of the Chinese Private Garden. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991.

Jullien, Francois. “La conception du monde naturel, en Chine et en Occident, selon Tang Junyi.” Extreme-orient Extreme-occident 3 (1983).

Kinsley, David. Ecology and Religion: Ecological Spirituality in Cross-Cultural Perspective. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 1995.

Kirkland, Russell. “Self-Fulfillment through Selflessness: The Moral Teachings of the Daode jing.” In Varieties of Ethical Reflection: New Directions for Ethics in a Global Context, ed. Michael Barnhart. Lanham, Md.: Lexington Books, 2002.
_______. “Taoism.” In Encylopedia of Bioethics, 2d ed., vol. 5, ed. Russell Kirkland, 2463–69. New York: Macmillan, 1995.
_______. “The Roots of Altruism in the Taoist Tradition.” Journal of the American Academy of Religion 54, no. 1 (1986): 59–74.

Kiyohiko Munakata. Sacred Mountains in Chinese Art: An Exhibition Organized by the Krannert Art Museum and Curated by Kiyohiko Munakata: Krannert Art Museum, November 9–December 16, 1990, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, January 25–March 31, 1991. Urbana, Ill.: University of Illinois Press, 1991.

Kohn, Livia. Cosmos and Community: The Ethical Dimension of Daoism. Cambridge, MA: Three Pines Press, 2004.

Koichi, Obi. Chugoku bungaku ni arawareta shizen to shizenkan (Nature and the Conception of Nature as Expressed in Chinese Literature). Tokyo: Iwanami Shoten, Showa 37, c1962.

Lai, Karyn L. “Conceptual Foundations for Environmental Ethics: A Daoist Perspective.” Environmental Ethics 25, no. 3 (2003): 247-266.
________.“Classical China.” In A Companion to Environmental Philosophy, ed. Dale Jamieson, 21-36. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2001.

Lau, D. C. and Roger T. Ames, trans. Yuan Dao: Tracing Dao to its Source. New York: Ballantine, 1998.

Lévi, Jean. “L’abstinence des céréales chez les Taoïstes.” Études chinoises 1 (1982): 3–47.

Li, Huey-li. “A Cross Cultural Critique of Ecofeminism.” In Ecofeminism: Women, Animals, Nature, ed. Greta Gaard, 272–94. Philadelphia, Pa.: Temple University Press, 1993.

Major, John S. Heaven and Earth in Early Han Thought: Chapters Three, Four, and Five of the Huaninanzi. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1993.

Miller, James. “Daoism and Ecology.” In Handbook of Religion and Ecology, ed. Roger Gottlieb. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006.
________.“Daoism and Nature.” In Nature Across Cultures: Non-Western Views of Nature and Environment, ed. Helaine Selin, 393-410. The Hague: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2003.
________. “Envisioning the Daoist Body in the Economy of Cosmic Power.” Daedalus: Religion and Ecology, Can the Climate Change? 130, no. 4 (2001): 265-282. (http://www.amacad.org/publications/fall2001/miller.aspx)
________. “Daoism and Ecology.” Earth Ethics 10, no. 1 (1998): 26–27.

Naquin, Susan, and Chun-fang Yu, eds. Pilgrims and Sacred Sites in China. Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 1992.

Needham, Joseph. Science and Civilisation in China. Vol. 6, Part 1: Botany. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986.

Needham, Joseph and Nathan Sivin. “The Theoretical Background of Elixir Alchemy.” In Science and Civilisation in China, Vol. 5, Part 4. ed. Joseph Needham, 210–322. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1980.

Neville, Robert C. “Units of Change-Units of Value.” Philosophy East and West 37, no. 2 (1987): 131–34.

Novak, Philip. “Tao How? Asian Religions and the Problem of Environmental Degradation.” ReVision 16 (1993): 77–82.

Palmer, Martin. “Saving China’s Holy Mountains.” People and the Planet 5, no. 1 (1996): 12–13. Available online at: (http://www.peopleandplanet.net/?lid=26658&topic=27&section=41)

Palmer, Martin and Victoria Finlay. Faith in Conservation: New Approaches to Religions and the Environment. Washington, DC: The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/ The World Bank, 2003.

Paper, Jordan. “Chinese Religion and Ecology.” Boston, Mass.: Boston Research Center for the 21st Century. Spring Lecture Series, Spiritual Ecology, 2000.

Paper, Jordan and Li Chuang Paper. “Chinese Religions, Population, and the Environment.” In Population, Consumption, and the Environment: Religious and Secular Responses, ed. Harold Coward, 173–91. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1995.

Parkes, Graham. “Human/Nature in Nietzsche and Taoism.” In Nature in Asian Traditions of Thought: Essays in Environmental Philosophy, eds. J. Baird Callicott and Roger T. Ames, 79–98. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1989.

Patterson, John. Back to Nature: A Daoist Philosophy for the Environment. Aotearoa, New Zealand: Campus Press, 1997.

Peerenboom, R. P. “The Rational American and the Inscrutable Oriental as seen from the Perspective of a Puzzled European: A View (and Response) in Three Stereotypes—A Reply to Carine Defoort.” Philosophy East and West 44, no. 2 (April 1994): 368–79.
_______. “Beyond Naturalism: A Reconstruction of Daoist Environmental Ethics.” Environmental Ethics 13, no. 1 (spring 1991): 3–22.

Peipei Qiu. “Onitsura's Makoto and the Daoist Concept of the Natural.” Philosophy East and West 51, no. 2 (2001): 232-246.

Qing Shitai. “The Eco-Ethical Thoughts of Daoism and its Modern Implication.” Journal of Sichuan University 1 (2002).

Rolston, Holmes, III. “Can the East Help the West to Value Nature?” Philosophy East and West 37, no. 2 (1987): 172–90.

Rowe, Sharon and James D. Sellmann. “An Uncommon Alliance: Ecofeminism and Classical Daoist Philosophy.” Environmental Ethics 25, no. 2 (2003): 129-148.

Santangelo, Paolo. “Ecologism versus Moralism: Conceptions of Nature in Some Literary Texts of Ming-Qing Times.” In Sediments of Time: Environment and Society in Chinese History, eds. Mark Elvin and Liu Ts’ui-jung, 617–56. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.

Schipper, Kristofer. The Taoist Body. Translated by Karen Duval. Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 1993.

Selin, Helaine, ed. Nature Across Cultures: Views of Nature and the Environment in Non-Western Cultures. The Hague and London: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2003.

Sivin, Nathan. Medicine, Philosophy, and Religion in Ancient China: Researches and Reflections. Aldershot, Hants.: Variorum, 1995.

Smil, Vaclav. China’s Environmental Crisis: An Inquiry into the Limits of National Development. Armonk, N.Y.: M. E. Sharpe, 1993.

Smith, Huston. “Tao Now: An Ecological Testament.” In Earth Might be Fair: Reflections on Ethics, Religion, and Ecology, ed. Ian G. Barbour, 62–82. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1972.

Soulé, Michael E., and Gary Lease, eds. Reinventing Nature?: Responses to Postmodern Deconstruction. Washington, D.C.: Island Press, 1995.

Spiegel, Richard. The Last World. The Taoist and Native American Philosophies as a Way of Living in Harmony with Nature. Hod Hasharon, Israel: Astrolog Publishing House, 2002.

Spring, David, and Ellen Spring, eds. Ecology and Religion in History. New York: Harper Torchbooks, 1995.

Stein, R. A. The World in Miniature: Container Gardens and Dwellings in Far Eastern Religious Thought. Translated by Phyllis Brooks. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1990.

Sylvan, Richard, and David Bennett. Of Utopias, Tao and Deep Ecology. Canberra: Australian National University, 1990.
________.“Taoism and Deep Ecology.” Ecologist 18, nos. 4/5 (1988): 148-159.

Tu Wei-ming. “The Continuity of Being: Chinese Visions of Nature.” In Nature in Asian Traditions of Thought: Essays in Environmental Philosophy, eds. J. Baird Callicott and Roger T. Ames, 67–78. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1989.

Tuan Yi-fu. Topophilia: A Study of Environmental Perception, Attitudes, and Values. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 1974.

Tucker, Mary Evelyn. Worldly Wonder: Religions Enter Their Ecological Phase. Chicago, IL: Open Court, 2003.
________. “Ecological Themes in Taoism and Confucianism.” In Worldviews and Ecology: Religion, Philosophy, and the Environment, eds. John Grim and Mary Evelyn Tucker, 150–60. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis Books, 1994.

Valder, Peter. Gardens In China. Portland, OR: Timber Press, 2002.

Wang, Aihe. Cosmology and Political Culture in Early China. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.

Wang Fengnian and Li Zhengfeng. “The Eco-Ethical Implication of Daoist Consumption Idea.” Journal of Tsinghua University 6 (2002).

Watts, Alan. Nature, Man, and Woman. New York: Vintage Books, 1991.

Wawrytko, Sandra A. "The Viability (Dao) and Virtuosity (De) of Daoist Ecology: Reversion (Fu) as Renewal." Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32, no. 1 (2005): 89-103.

Woo, Franklin J. Review of Daoism and Ecology: Ways within a Cosmic Landscape. China Review International 9, no. 1 (2002): 112-118.

Xie Yangju. "Western Recognition of Daoism as Environmental Philosophy." Jiangxi Social Sciences 6 (2001).

Yan Yunxiang. The Flow of Gifts: Reciprocity and Social Networks in a Chinese Village. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1996.

Yang, Mayfair. Gifts, Favors, and Banquets: The Art of Social Relationships in China. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1994.

Zimmerman, Michael E. Contesting Earth’s Future: Radical Ecology and Postmodernity. Berkeley, Calif.: Unviersity of California Press, 1994.

 

Copyright © 2001 Center for the Study of World Religions, Harvard Divinity School.
Reprinted with permission.